Torts: cases and materials

Front Cover
Aspen Publishers, 2003 - Law - 852 pages
0 Reviews
This concise new casebook is ideally suited for a one-semester, four-credit course. With key cases and understandable notes skillfully presented in just 800 pages, Torts: Cases and Materials offers a refreshing, enjoyable choice for students and instructors.This new casebook is designed to facilitate student comprehension:
- eminently teachable cases and informative topical notes convey the core of tort law
- notes challenge students to consider provocative questions about the cases
- "Authors' Dialogues, " a series of informal, highly engaging in-text discussions and debates between the authors, raise points about the topic under discussion while modeling the skills of persuasion and critical thinking
- short hypotheticals throughout the book test variations on fact patterns
- carefully edited cases strike the right balance between preserving the flavor of the case and overwhelming students with details
- a comprehensive Teacher's Manual answers questions raised in the text, identifies important secondary literature, and provides commentary on the Authors' Dialogues as well as suggestions for using the Chat Rooms in class or as reading assignmentsThis concise yet thorough casebook addresses the full range of issues, including:
- intentional Torts and privileges/defenses
- negligence
- actual causation and proximate causation
- nonliability for foreseeable consequences
- owners and occupiers of land
- affirmative defenses
- joint tortfeasors
- strict liability
- products liability
- trespass to land and nuisance
- damages
- compensation systems as alternatives
- defamation and privacyBefore you adopt a casebook for your next Tortscourse, be sure to review the book that was created for effective learning and efficient teaching--Aaron D. Twerski and James A. Henderson's Torts: Cases and Materials.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Interference with Persons and Property
7
B Battery
19
Copyright

52 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Twerski is Newell De Valpine Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School.

Henderson is Frank B. Ingersoll Professor of Law, Cornell University Law School.

Bibliographic information