Dramatic scenes and characters (Google eBook)

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William James Linton, Richard Henry Stoddard
K. Paul, Trench & Company, 1884 - English poetry
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Page 77 - Can such things be, And overcome us like a summer's cloud, Without our special wonder ? You make me strange Even to the disposition that I owe, When now I think you can behold such sights, And keep the natural ruby of your cheeks, When mine is blanch'd with fear.
Page 99 - Although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract to-night : It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden, Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be, Ere one can say It lightens.
Page 76 - Avaunt ! and quit my sight ! let the earth hide thee! Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold ; Thou hast no speculation in those eyes Which thou dost glare with ! Lady M.
Page 98 - Thou mayst prove false; at lovers' perjuries, They say, Jove laughs. O, gentle Romeo, If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully : Or, if thou think'st I am too quickly won, I'll frown, and be perverse, and say thee nay, So thou wilt woo ; but else, not for the world. In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond ; And therefore thou mayst think my 'havior light ; But trust me, gentleman, I'll prove more true Than those that have more cunning to be strange.
Page 96 - O, speak again, bright angel! for thou art As glorious to this night, being o'er my head As is a winged messenger of heaven Unto the white-upturned wondering eyes Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him When he bestrides the lazy-pacing clouds And sails upon the bosom of the air.
Page 96 - But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks! It is the east, and Juliet is the sun ! Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she...
Page 82 - Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls : Who steals my purse steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands ; But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him And makes me poor indeed.
Page 123 - Do we succeed? Is our day come? and holds it? Face. The evening will set red upon you, sir; You have colour for it, crimson : the red ferment Has done, his office; three hours hence prepare you To see projection. Mam. Pertinax, my Surly, Again I say to thee aloud, Be rich. This day thou shalt have ingots; and to-morrow Give lords th
Page 83 - To show the love and duty that I bear you With franker spirit : therefore, as I am bound, Receive it from me. I speak not yet of proof. Look to your wife : observe her well with Cassio ; Wear your eye thus, not jealous nor secure : I would not have your free and noble nature Out of self-bounty be abused; look to't: I know our country disposition well ; In Venice they do let heaven see the pranks They dare not show their husbands ; their best conscience Is not to leave 't undone, but keep 't unknown.
Page 93 - You see me here, you gods, a poor old man, As full of grief as age, wretched in both. If it be you that stirs these daughters...

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