The Nahuas After the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth Through Eighteenth Centuries

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Stanford University Press, 1992 - History - 650 pages
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A monumental achievement of scholarship, this volume on the Nahua Indians of Central Mexico (often called Aztecs) constitutes our best understanding of any New World indigenous society in the period following European contact.

Simply put, the purpose of this book is to throw light on the history of Nahua society and culture through the use of records in Nahuatl, concentrating on the time when the bulk of the extant documents were written, between about 1540-50 and the late eighteenth century. At the same time, the earliest records are full of implications for the very first years after contact, and ultimately for the preconquest epoch as well, both of which are touched on here in ways that are more than introductory or ancillary.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Altepetl
14
Household
59
j Social Differentiation
94
Land and Living
141
Language
261
Ways of Writing
326
Forms of Expression
374
IO Conclusion
427
Appendix A Four Nahuatl Documents
455
Appendix B Molinas Model Testament
468
Notes
477
Glossary
607
Bibliography
613
Index
631
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

James Lockhart, Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles, is the author of Spanish Peru, 1532-1560 and several substantial articles on the theory and practice of Latin American social history. He previously taught at Colgate University and the University of Texas, and has served as associate editor of the Hispanic American Historical Review.

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