Upland Game Birds (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1902 - Game and game-birds - 429 pages
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Page 267 - The owl sails around the spot to select his prey ; but, notwithstanding the almost inaudible action of his pinions, the quick ear of one of the slumberers perceives the danger, which is immediately announced to the whole party by a chuck; thus alarmed, they rise on their legs, and watch the motions of the owl, who, darting like an arrow, would inevitably secure the individual at which he aimed, did not the latter suddenly drop his head, squat, and spread his tail over his back ; the owl then glances...
Page 234 - Look — look lot," he replied. A twinkle in his eye warned me that I had better be mighty careful, and I felt certain he had already seen the birds. But where? Standing perfectly still, I first scanned the snowy trees. Nothing there. Then, remembering the ways of the quail and the many times I had detected birds upon the ground ahead of the dogs, I began a close scrutiny of the snow a few yards ahead. Presently a shiny ebon point caught my eye, then a dull point equally black — then, as if my...
Page 264 - If, in thus endeavouring to regain the land, they approach an elevated or inaccessible bank, their exertions are remitted, they resign themselves to the stream for a short time, in order to gain strength, and then, with one violent effort, escape from the water.
Page 231 - Jo certainly showed me all there was in it. Before half a mile had been covered he had me fumbling with mittenless hand at the unruly button at my throat, and by the time a mile lay behind, my forehead was damp in spite of an air that nipped like a mink-trap. At length we reached the edge of a tongue of fir woods, where Jo paused.
Page 431 - SANDYS and TS VAN DYKE With many illustrations by LA FUERTES, AB FROST, JO NUGENT, and CL BULL. SALMON AND TROUT By DEAN SAGE, WC HARRIS, and CH TOWNSEND.
Page 240 - Pole in twenty minutes and then — 42O a rasp of a twig across my cold nose startled and hurt me so that I noticed I was running into cover. The edge of the woods! Yes and there was Joe's track and Joe himself just ahead. In ten minutes we were at the cabin. Fifteen minutes later we had got rid of snowy outer garb and had looked upon something red and oh! so welcome. Presently Joe raised his drawn face from his hands and said : " Bad to kill dem white snowbird. But you good — run like bull moose...
Page 236 - Two were perfect for mounting and even the shattered one might, with extra care, be saved. So far, so good. I had killed my own specimens and added a new bird to the score of the veteran twelve-gauge. I pocketed the birds, broke the gun, put in fresh shells and, on the strength of an easy but clean kill, produced the flask. As Joe took his dose, I noticed his face. Instead of the customary grin, it showed grave and solemn as an owl's. The sparkle of the eye, too, was missing and when the sight of...
Page 236 - he tersely queried, as I made a significant motion. I was somewhat astonished. " Bad luck kill dem — look dur ! " Something in his voice startled me, and my eyes flashed northward, whither his long arm pointed. Under great stress a man sometimes thinks of whimsical things. What I thought was — "I've killed three pups of the North Pole, and here's the whole frapped Arctic Circle coming south to see about it ! " Rolling steadily down, like snowy surf, mountains high, came a squall the like of...
Page 237 - At last, with a roar and a wild horizontal rush of snow, the full strength of the storm struck us. Then we heard the true howl of the White Wolf of the North as the men in igloos hear it when the sea solidifies. Mercifully it was at our backs — any other point would have meant— but there's cold comfort in that!
Page 266 - ... often escape by a somewhat remarkable manoeuvre. The owl sails around the spot to select his prey ; but, notwithstanding- the almost inaudible action of his pinions, the quick ear of one of the slumberers perceives the danger, which is immediately announced to the whole party by a...

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