Biography and History of the Indians of North America: Comprising a General Account of Them, and Details in the Lives of All the Most Distinguished Chiefs, and Others who Have Been Noted, Among the Various Indian Nations ... Also, a History of Their Wars; Their Manners and Customs; and the Most Celebrated Speeches of Their Orators ... Likewise Exhibiting an Analysis of the ... Authors who Have Written Upon ... the First Peopling of America ... (Google eBook)

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O.L. Perkins, 1834 - Indians of North America - 541 pages
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Page 27 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the Whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, ' Logan is the friend of white men.
Page 81 - I may challenge the whole orations of Demosthenes and Cicero, and of any more eminent orator, if Europe has furnished more eminent, to produce a single passage, superior to the speech of Logan, a Mingo chief, to Lord Dunmore, when governor of this state.
Page 27 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it; I have killed many; I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace; but do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 101 - The way, and the only way, to check and to stop this evil, is, for all the red men to unite in claiming a common and equal right in the land ; as it was at first, and should be yet; for it never was divided, but belongs to all, for the use of each. That no part has a right to sell, 'even to each other, much less to strangers; those who want all, and will not do with less.
Page 3 - I seized upon. They were all of one nation, but of several parts, and several families. This accident must be acknowledged the means, under God, of putting on foot and giving life to all our plantations.
Page 27 - We are, however, not the less obliged by your kind offer, though we decline accepting it: and to show our grateful sense of it, if the gentlemen of Virginia will send us a dozen of their sons, we will take great care of their education, instruct them in all we know, and make men of them.
Page 78 - But an evil day came upon us. Your forefathers crossed the great waters, and landed on this island. Their numbers were small. They found friends and not enemies. They told us they had fled from their own country for fear of wicked men, and come here to enjoy their religion. They asked for a small seat. We took pity on them, granted their request, and they sat down among us. We gave them corn and meat They gave us poison in return.
Page 79 - Brother, continue to listen. You say that you are sent to instruct us how to worship the Great Spirit agreeably to his mind, and if we do not take hold of the religion which you white people teach, we shall be unhappy hereafter; you say that you are right, and we are lost; how do we know this to be true?
Page 87 - In that time came a company of Indians to us, near thirty, all on horseback. My heart skipped within me, thinking they had been Englishmen at the first sight of them, for they were dressed in English apparel, with hats, white neckcloths, and sashes about their waists, and ribbons upon their shoulders...
Page 12 - So I thought to myself since I cannot do any business to-day, I may as well go to the meeting too, and I went with him. There stood up a man in black, and began to talk to the people very angrily. I did not understand what he said: but perceiving that he looked much at me and at...

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