Missing Kissinger

Front Cover
Random House, Oct 31, 2011 - Fiction - 224 pages
19 Reviews

'Etgar Keret's short stories are fierce, funny, full of energy and insight, and at the same time they are often deep, tragic and very moving' - Amos Oz

At a children's tea party, a magician tries to pull a rabbit out of a hat, but takes out only its head; a young man has a mother and girlfriend who each demand that he gives them the other one's heart; while a Nobel Laureate asks an orphan to perform a very strange task.

In Etgar Keret's blackly comic stories the unexpected can, and usually does, happen. They are clever, quick, sometimes violent and often intensely poignant. They are, in short, brilliant.

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Review: Missing Kissinger

User Review  - Tyler Jones - Goodreads

I remember the first time I heard "The Message" by Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five and I remember the first time I heard "Smells like Teen Spirit". I was, on both occasions, whacked in the head ... Read full review

Review: Missing Kissinger

User Review  - Guy Jacobs - Goodreads

If you have not read Etgar Keret's work, you are missing out on a true original. This collection of super shorts has inspired many authors in the current generation of writers (this one included) to think outside the box and use language as a camera to capture the strange realities of the world. Read full review

About the author (2011)

Born in Tel Aviv in 1967, Etgar Keret is one of the leading voices in Israeli literature and cinema. He is the author of five bestselling collections, which have been translated into twenty-nine languages. His writing has been published in the New York Times, le Monde, the Guardian, the Paris Review and Zoetrope. He has also written a number of award-winning screenplays, and Jellyfish, his first film as a director along with his wife Shira Geffen, won the Camera d'Or prize for best first feature at Cannes in 2007. In 2010 he was awarded the Chevalier medallion of France's Order of Arts and Letters.

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