Miscellanies (Google eBook)

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Baker and Scribner, 1850 - American essays - 298 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
81
III
101
IV
157
V
185
VI
251
VII
284

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Page 151 - I have sought the Lord night and day, that He would rather slay me than put me upon the doing of this work.
Page 150 - You have sat too long here for any good you have been doing. Depart, I say, and let us have done with you. In the name of God, go!
Page 140 - We are upon an Engagement very difficult. The Enemy hath blocked up our way at the Pass at Copperspath, through which we cannot get without almost a miracle. He lieth so upon the Hills that we know not how to come that way without great difficulty; and our lying here daily consumeth our men, who fall sick beyond imagination.
Page 140 - If your forces had been in a readiness to have fallen upon the back of Copperspath, it might have occasioned supplies to have come to us. But the only wise God knows what is best. All shall work for Good. Our spirits are comfortable, praised be the Lord, though our present condition be as it is.
Page 140 - I perceive your forces are not in a capacity for present relief; wherefore (whatever becomes of us) it will be well for you to get what forces you can together; and the South to help what they can. The business nearly concerneth all good people. If your forces had been in a readiness to have fallen upon the back of Copperspath, it might have occasioned supplies to have come to us; but the only wise God knows what is best. All shall work for good. Our spirits are comfortable (praised be the Lord),...
Page 104 - ... what is it, all this Rushworthian inarticulate rubbish-continent, in its ghastly dim twilight, with its haggard wrecks and pale shadows ; what is it, but the common Kingdom of Death ? This is what we call Death, this mouldering dumb wilderness of things once alive. Behold here the final evanescence of Formed human things ; they had form, but they are changing into sheer formlessness ; ancient human speech itself has sunk into unintelligible maundering. This is the collapse, the etiolation...
Page 222 - exclaimed he ; ' how could they allow these scoundrels to enter ? They ought to have blown four or five hundred of them into the air with cannon ; the rest would then have taken to their ' DE BOUKKIENNE, tip 49.]
Page 144 - I wish that all honest hearts may give the glory of this to God alone, to whom indeed the praise of this mercy belongs.
Page 282 - Come, come ! I am ready I am ready to lay down my life for thy truth . . . patient as a lamb. For it is the cause of justice it is thine. ... I will never separate myself from thee ; neither now, nor through eternity. . . . And though the world should be filled with devils though my body, which is still the work of thy hands, should be slain...
Page 105 - ... progress towards utter silence and disappearance ; disastrous ever-deepening Dusk of Gods and Men ! Why has the living ventured thither, down from the cheerful light, across the Lethe-swamps and tartarean Phlegethons, onwards to these baleful halls of Dis and the three-headed Dog ? Some Destiny drives him.

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