Public Key Infrastructure: Building Trusted Applications and Web Services (Google eBook)

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CRC Press, May 11, 2004 - Computers - 448 pages
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With the recent Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act, public key cryptography, digital signatures, and digital certificates are finally emerging as a ubiquitous part of the Information Technology landscape. Although these technologies have been around for over twenty years, this legislative move will surely boost e-commerce activity. Secure electronic business transactions, such as contracts, legal documents, insurance, and bank loans are now legally recognized. In order to adjust to the realities of the marketplace, other services may be needed, such as a non-repudiation service, digital notary, or digital time-stamping service. The collection of these components, known as Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), is paving the way for secure communications within organizations and on the public Internet.
  

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Page 8 - Internet to securely and privately exchange data and money through the use of a public and a private cryptographic key pair that is obtained and shared through a trusted authority.
Page xxiii - We also reviewed and analyzed the National Strategy for Homeland Security, the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace, the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets, the National Strategy for Combating Terrorism, l the Homeland Security Act of 2002/and other relevant federal policies.
Page ii - Cyber Forensics: A Field Manual for Collecting, Examining, and Preserving Evidence of Computer Crimes Albert J.
Page 29 - The SSL protocol includes two subprotocols: the SSL record protocol and the SSL handshake protocol. The SSL record protocol defines the format used to transmit data. The SSL handshake protocol involves using the SSL record protocol to exchange a series of messages between an SSL-enabled server and an SSL-enabled client when they first establish an SSL connection. This exchange of messages is designed to facilitate the following actions: • Authenticate the server to the client.

About the author (2004)

John Vacca resides in Ohio and has served as a computer security official with NASA. He has written over twenty books on computer-related topics, including Electronic Commerce 3/E.

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