Ajanta: Painting, sculpture, architecture

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BRILL, 2005 - Architecture - 356 pages
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Annotation. Volume Two begins with the contentious, yet challenging, views of Hans Bakker and Richard Cohen, both of whom are involved with an overview of Ajanta's development. This is explored further in shorter essays by Karl Khandalavala, Arvind Jamkhedkar, and Brahmanand Deshpande. At the same time, the author presents a detailed analysis of the form and development of Cave 26, as a model upon which his other arguments are built.
  

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Contents

The Earliest Caves c 100 BCE to c 150 CE
1
460 Ajantas Vakataka Renaissance Conceived
6
461 Planning begun at the Vakataka courts and at Ajanta itself
8
462 Excavations begin at the site
12
463464465 Early developments and decisions
15
466 A signal year for innovations at the site
25
467 Work Continues in Normal Course
29
468 Ajantas First Buddha Images
33
The Period of Confl ict and Asmaka Takeover
53
475478 Asmaka Control of the Site
56
The Impact of Bagh
66
Aspects of Patronage
67
The Decoration of the Caves
70
The Primacy of Cave 1
73
The Cave 1 Buddha and the Death of Harisena late 477
80
The Traumas of 478
82

The Privileged Lesser Caves shrines made Lower 6 7 11 15
36
Prime Minister Varahadevas Cave 16
40
King Upendraguptas Caves 17 19 20 29
45
The Emperor Harisenas Cave 1 fl ourishes
49
Evolution of Cell Doorway Fittings from 468 through 471
51
The Period of Disruption 479480
96
The End of Patronage
106
A Brief Appreciation
108
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About the author (2005)

Walter M. Spink, Ph.D. (1954), Harvard, is Professor Emeritus, History of Art, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He has published widely on Indian Art in general, and Ajanta and related sites in particular.