Tragedy of Cymbeline (Google eBook)

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Harper & bros., 1887 - Readers - 231 pages
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Page 33 - I'll willingly to him : to gain his colour, I'd let a parish of such Clotens' blood, And praise myself for charity. [Exit. Bel. O thou goddess, Thou divine Nature, how thyself thou blazon'st In these two princely boys ! They are as gentle As zephyrs, blowing below the violet, Not wagging his sweet head : and yet as rough, Their royal blood enchafed, as the rudest wind, That by the top doth take the mountain pine And make him stoop to the vale.
Page 233 - Till thou applaud the deed. Come, seeling night, Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day; And with thy bloody and invisible hand Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond Which keeps me pale!
Page 121 - Fear no more the heat o' the sun, Nor the furious winter's rages; Thou thy worldly task hast done. Home art gone and ta'en thy wages: Golden lads and girls all must, As chimney-sweepers, come to dust. Fear no more the frown o...
Page 177 - Laud we the gods; And let our crooked smokes climb to their nostrils From our bless'd altars. Publish we this peace To all our subjects. Set we forward: let A Roman and a British ensign wave Friendly together; so through Lud's town march: And in the temple of great Jupiter Our peace we'll ratify; seal it with feasts.
Page 119 - With fairest flowers, Whilst summer lasts, and I live here, Fidele, I'll sweeten thy sad grave : thou shalt not lack The flower, that's like thy face, pale primrose ; nor The azur'd hare-bell, like thy veins ; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, Out-sweeten'd not thy breath...
Page 242 - This play has many just sentiments, some natural dialogues, and some pleasing scenes, but they are obtained at the expence of much incongruity. To remark the folly of the fiction, the absurdity of the conduct, the confusion of the names, and manners of different times, and the impossibility of the events in any system of life...
Page 210 - Princes grace, yet want her Peeres; To have thy asking, yet waite manie yeeres; To fret thy soule with crosses and with cares; To eate thy heart through comfortlesse dispaires; To fawne, to crowche, to waite, to ride, to ronne, To spend, to give, to want, to be undonne.

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