Westminster Hall, or, Professional relics and anecdotes of the bar, bench, and woolsack (Google eBook)

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J. Knight & H. Lacey, 1825 - Law
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Page 119 - And yet Time hath his revolutions; there must be a period and an end to all temporal things —finis rerum — an end of names. and dignities, and whatsoever is terrene; —and why not of De Vere ?— for where is BOHUN? Where is MOWBRAY? Where is MORTIMER? Nay, which is more, and most of all, where is PLANTAGENET ? They are entombed in the urns and sepulchres of mortality!
Page 158 - Selden was a person whom no character can flatter, or transmit in any expressions equal to his merit and virtue. He was of so stupendous learning in all kinds and in all languages, (as may appear in his excellent and transcendent writings,) that a man would have thought he had been entirely conversant amongst books, and had never spent an hour but in reading and writing...
Page 209 - I wish popularity: but, it is that popularity which follows; not that which is run after. It is that popularity which, sooner or later, never fails to do justice to the pursuit of noble ends, by noble means. I will not do that which my conscience tells me is wrong, upon this occasion; to gain the huzzas of thousands, or the daily praise of all the papers which come from the press...
Page 40 - Some natural tears they dropt, but wiped them soon: The world was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide. They, hand in hand, with wandering steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.
Page 99 - In behalf of the Nose it will quickly appear, And your lordship, he said, will undoubtedly find That the Nose has had spectacles always in wear, Which amounts to possession time out of mind.
Page 88 - The law against witches does not prove there be any ; but it punishes the malice of those people, that use such means to take away men's lives : if one should profess that by turning his hat thrice, and crying buz, he could take away a man's life, though in truth he could do no such thing : yet this were a just law made by the state, that whosoever should turn his hat thrice, and cry buz, with an intention to take away a man's life, shall be put to death.
Page 130 - Well, I will now make it appear to the world, that there never lived a viler viper upon the face of the earth than thou.
Page 123 - ... out of thy writing trade forty years ago it had been happy. Thou pretendest to be a preacher of the gospel of peace, and thou hast one foot in the grave ; it is time for thee to begin to think what account thou intendest to give ; but leave thee to thyself and I see thou wilt go on as thou hast begun ; but, by the grace of God, I'll look after thee.
Page 112 - ... that the law was the golden metwand and measure to try the causes of the subjects, and which protected his Majesty in safety and peace. With which the King was greatly offended, and said that then he should be under the law, which was treason to affirm, as he said; to which I said that Bracton saith, quod Rex non debet esse sub homine sed sub Deo et lege [that the King ought not to be under man but under God and under the law—BT\.
Page 73 - ... do but himself. With all this, he had a goodness of nature and disposition in so great a degree that he may be deservedly styled a philanthrope. He was a very Silenus to the boys, as in this place I may term the students of the law, to make them merry whenever they had a mind to it. He had nothing of rigid or austere in him. If any near him at the bar, grumbled at his stench, he ever converted the complaint into content and laughing with the abundance of his wit.

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