Zen Buddhism and Hasidism: a comparative study

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University Press of America, Incorporated, 1995 - Religion - 189 pages
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In this work Jacob Yuroh Teshima juxtaposes two religions whose origins are completely different: Zen Buddhism and Hasidic Judaism. The purpose of this comparative study is not to determine which religion is superior, but rather to compare their functional equivalents. After presenting backgrounds of the two religions, Dr. Teshima examines the Zen Buddhist practice of zazen and Hasidism's devequth, or meditation on God. He then discusses how each religion comes to terms with the major obstacle in the practice of comtemplation: distracting thoughts. Teshima compares conceptions of man offered by the two religions, making clear their fundamental differences concerning the nature of selfhood and source of fulfillment. The study concludes with an examination of how the two religions come to terms with the insecurity of life and what it is that gives life meaning and significance. Contents: Introduction to Zen Buddhism and Hasidism; Zazen and Devequth; The Problem of "Strange Thoughts"; Annihilating Selfhood and Attaining Ecstasy; The Concept of Man; Insecurity of Life: The Hasidic Approach to Exile and the Zen Approach to Birth and Death.

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Contents

Zazen and Devequth
13
The Problem of Strange Thoughts
57
Annihiating Selfhood and Attaining Ecstasy
79
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