Memoirs of the reign of George III to the session of Parliament ending A.D. 1793, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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G.G. and J. Robinson, 1801 - Great Britain
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Page 309 - ... impotent doubly so, indeed, from this mercenary aid on which you rely; for it irritates, to an incurable resentment, the minds of your enemies to overrun them with the mercenary sons of rapine and plunder, devoting them and their possessions to the rapacity of hireling cruelty ! If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms never, never, never!
Page 69 - ... patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans, whigs and tories, treacherous friends and open enemies, that it was indeed a very curious show, but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to stand on.
Page 309 - Your efforts are for ever vain and impotent doubly so from this mercenary aid on which you rely, for it irritates to an incurable resentment the minds of your enemies to overrun them with the mercenary sons of rapine and plunder; devoting them and their possessions to the rapacity of hireling...
Page 309 - But, my lords, who is the man, that, in addition to the disgraces and mischiefs of the war, has dared to authorize and associate to our arms the tomahawk and scalping-knife of the savage; to call into civilized alliance the wild and inhuman inhabitant of the woods...
Page 231 - Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, FREE AND INDEPENDENT STATES ; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connexion between them and the state of Great Britain* is, and ought to be, totally dissolved...
Page 96 - Their force would be most disproportionately exerted against a brave, generous, and united people, with arms in their hands, and courage in their hearts : three millions of people, the genuine descendants of a valiant and pious ancestry, driven to those deserts by the narrow maxims of a superstitious tyranny.
Page 101 - To conclude, my lords, if the ministers thus persevere in misadvising and misleading the king, I will not say, that they can alienate the affections of his subjects from his crown ; but I will affirm, that they will make the crown not worth his wearing. I will not say that the king is betrayed ; but I will pronounce, that the kingdom is undone.
Page 88 - From shopkeepers, tradesmen, and attornies, they are become statesmen and legislators, and are employed in contriving a new form of government for an extensive empire, which, they flatter themselves, will become, and which, indeed, seems very likely to become, one of the greatest and most formidable that ever was in the world.
Page 73 - By shutting up the port of Boston, some imagine that the course of trade might be turned hither, and to our benefit ; but nature, in the formation of our harbour, forbids our becoming rivals in commerce with that convenient mart.
Page 310 - You cannot conciliate America by your present measures. You cannot subdue her by your present or by any measures. What, then, can you do ? You cannot conquer ; you cannot gain ; but you can address ; you can lull the fears and anxieties of the moment into an ignorance of the danger that should produce them.

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