The University Geological Survey of Kansas, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
The Survey, 1898 - Geology - 594 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 214 - Tylosaurns and •Platecarpus, to move about on terra firma without the aid of limbs, and these were not at all fitted for land locomotion. That they may have frequented the beaches for the purpose of depositing their eggs is probable, though not certain. They were certainly not viviparous. That they were pugnacious in the extreme is very evident from the many scars and mutilations which they suffered during life. I have observed exostosial growth in their lower jaws, the vertebra, especially those...
Page 475 - The second lateral sinus is about half as wide and nearly two-thirds as long as the first, more or less oblique, and rather deeply divided at the extremity into two subequal, bifurcating and obtusely digitate terminal branches. The second lateral lobe is as long as the second lateral sinus, but a little narrower, and ornamented with three variously digitate terminal branches, the middle one of which is longer than the others, a little oblique, and not exactly central. The third lateral lobe is small,...
Page 187 - The determination of this species rests on a series of specimens from the yellow chalk at a point six miles south of Sheridan, Kan. They consist of three vertebra; and fragments of atlas, with numerous portions of cranium and proximal extremity of scapula.
Page 463 - On attaining to two and one-half to three inches in diameter, costae, nodes, and keel becoming more prominent, the latter being strongly compressed and deeply and largely scalloped, with divisions rounded in outline ; while, at this stage of growth, the periphery as seen in profile would seem to be very deeply sulcated on each side of the keel, but this is due to the prominence of the row of nodes on either side of the same.
Page 30 - ... bottom among shallow pools from which his exhausted energies could not extricate him. PART II — GEOLOGY. The geology of this region has been very partially explored, but appears to be quite simple. The following description of the section along the line of the Kansas Pacific Railroad, will probably apply to similar sections north and south of it. The formations referable to the cretacious period on this line, are those called by Messrs.
Page 460 - ... gradually in size, somewhat compressed laterally, and a little excavated without being distinctly channeled on each side of the ventral keel ; inner ones but slightly embraced by each succeeding turn, and consequently well exposed in the wide umbilicus. Surface ornamented with numerous unequal...
Page 467 - Shell compressed-discoidal, wi th umbilicus apparently nearly or quite twice as wide as the outer whorl ; volutions very narrow, with dorso-ventral and transverse diameters equal, and section subquadrangular, those within scarcely one-sixth embraced by the succeeding turn ; cost...
Page 473 - Shell compressed- subglobose; rounded on the periphery; umbilicus small, deep, and acutely conical, between one-third and one-half as wide as the breadth of the outer whorl from the dorsal to the ventral side, showing about one-third of each inner volution. Whorls increasing rather rapidly in size, particularly in convexity, sloping on each side from near the umbilicus (with a slightly convex outline) toward the periphery, and rounding abruptly into the umbilicus on the inner side, each of those...
Page 506 - ... about two to three or four sinuous, spreading and digitate branchlets: first lateral lobe oblong-ovate, being longer and narrower than the siphonal lobe, and deeply divided at its end into two very nearly equal branches, with each four to five spreading and digitate subdivisions, in part generally so arranged as to give the main branches a tripartite appearance at their extremities ; second lateral sinus of nearly the same size as the first, and, excepting in unimportant details, similarly branched...
Page 450 - Shell medium size, equivalve or nearly so, valves suborbicular, height of the valves being greater than their lengths from the anterior to the posterior side, very gibbous ; anterior and posterior sides rounded, and forming with the base about three-fourths of a circle, the posterior curve being broader than the other ; cardinal margin comparatively short, and apparently a little arched; beaks large, elevated, gibbous, distinctly incurved and directed obliquely forward, so as to bring its point near...

Bibliographic information