The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, in Ten Volumes: King Henry V. King Henry VI (Google eBook)

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Collins & Hannay, 1823
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Page 41 - Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more ; Or close the wall up with our English dead ! In peace, there's nothing so becomes a man, As modest stillness, and humility : But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger...
Page 21 - Creatures that by a rule in nature teach The act of order to a peopled kingdom. They have a king, and officers of sorts, Where some like magistrates correct at home; Others like merchants venture trade abroad; Others like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds...
Page 320 - Seeking a way, and straying from the way ; * Not knowing how to find the open air, * But toiling desperately to find it out, * Torment myself to catch the English crown : * And from that torment I will free myself, * Or hew my way out with a bloody axe. Why, I can smile, and murder while I smile ; ' And cry, content, to that which grieves my heart ; * And wet my cheeks with artificial tears, * And frame my face to all occasions.
Page 71 - This story shall the good man teach his son; And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go. by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remembered , We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition...
Page 42 - That those whom you call'd fathers did beget you. Be copy now to men of grosser blood, And teach them how to war. And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture; let us swear That you are worth your breeding, which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips, Straining upon the start. The game's afoot! Follow your spirit, and upon this charge Cry, "God...
Page 306 - O God, methinks it were a happy life To be no better than a homely swain; To sit upon a hill, as I do now, To carve out dials quaintly, point by point, Thereby to see the minutes how they run, How many make the hour full complete; How many hours bring about the day; How many days will finish up the year; How many years a mortal man may live. When this is known, then to divide the times: So many hours must I tend my flock; So many hours must I take my rest; So many hours must I contemplate; So many...
Page 247 - Be brave then ; for your captain is brave, and vows reformation. There shall be, in England, seven half-penny loaves sold for a penny : the threehooped pot shall have ten hoops ; and I will make j it felony, to drink small beer: all the realm shall : be in common, and in Cheapside shall my palfrey go to grass.
Page 254 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar-school ; and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used ; and, contrary to the king, his crown, and dignity, thou hast built a paper-mill.
Page 71 - And say To-morrow is Saint Crispian ; Then will he strip his sleeve, and show his scars, And say, These wounds I had on Crispin's day. Old men forget ; yet all shall be forgot, But he'll remember, with advantages, What feats he did that day. Then shall our names, Familiar in...

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