Asian Forms of the Nation

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Stein T°nnesson, Hans Antl÷v
Psychology Press, 1996 - History - 362 pages
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The general tendency among theorists in nationalism and national identity has been to assume that the modernization process in Asia and Africa is a kind of distorted reflection of a Western precedent; Asian forms of the nation have rarely been seen as independent, alternative models. Among today's leading theoreticians, there is a growing tendency to take Asia seriously, and to include Asian examples in the general discussion. The aim of the present collection is to build on and reinforce this tendency. It does not postulate any specifically Asian form of the nation, as opposed to a Western one. Rather, it seeks to demonstrate that in Asia, as well as in Europe, each nation forms a unique amalgam which can be compared fruitfully with others. History, culture and geography have posed various kinds of limits to what can be imagined (as Benedict Anderson puts it). The relationship between geographical space and national construction is explored in depth here.

  

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE
1
CHAPTER ELEVEN 297
21
CHAPTER TWELVE 323
38
CHAPTER TWO
41
Figures
55
CHAPTER THREE
67
Vietnam in the grip of Japanese imperialism
92
CHAPTER FOUR
93
CHAPTER FIVE
131
The legendary home of the Karen 250
135
Nonbounded Siam and its margins 74
150
CHAPTER SIX
151
CHAPTER SEVEN
181
CHAPTER EIGHT
205
Himalayan region with boundaries of Modern Nepal
207
CHAPTER NINE
237

Towards an Indochinese form of the nation roads rivers
104

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About the author (1996)

Stein Tonnesson is a Research Fellow at the International Peace Research Institute, Oslo. He is the author of several scholarly articles and books, including 1946: Outbreak of the Indochina War (l'Harmattan, 1987).

Hans Antlov is an anthropologist working in Jakarta for the Ford Foundation. Tak-Wing Ngo is Lecturer in Chinese Politics at the Sinological Institute, Leiden Univerrsity.

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