Bacteria and the Germ Theory of Disease (Google eBook)

Front Cover
W. T. Keener, 1888 - Bacteriology - 219 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - ... entertaining, liberal, and while scientific is understandingly technical. There is sufficient clinical importance attached to this work to make the following extracts interesting at this time, and they may provoke discussion that will lead to a better understanding of the theories herein set forth. " In the light of the germ theory, diseases are to be considered as a struggle between the organism and the parasite invading it.
Page 181 - Chauveau4 proved that vaccine virus is deprived of its active substance by filtration. Hence, it became more than probable that the contagion was a living organism, and no gaseous or diffusible product. " For when he carefully poured a stratum of water upon a layer of lymph, in tiny tubes, he obtained a diffusion of the dissolved material into the water, but this clear solution could not produce pustules like the insoluble residue.
Page 3 - ... its existence with all other beings with which it comes in immediate contact. In numerous instances, this struggle amounts to the preying of a smaller species upon the body of larger creatures, the former deriving from the organism of their host thtir means of subsistence. Throughout the animal and vegetable kingdoms, parasitism is of common occurrence. Often the host carries but a single invader, but as the discrepancy between the size of the parasite and the organism harboring it increases,...
Page 4 - ... organism of their host thtir means of subsistence. Throughout the animal and vegetable kingdoms, parasitism is of common occurrence. Often the host carries but a single invader, but as the discrepancy between the size of the parasite and the organism harboring it increases, the number of the intruders is apt to enlarge. The greater the difference in the dimensions of the contending beings and the wider they are apart in the botanical and zoological scale, the more desperate does the struggle...
Page 192 - bacillus leprae" is described as a very delicate rod, about one-half the length of a red blood disc, and one-fourth as wide as long, tapering at the ends. The rod may be thickened by several nodosities—the spores (Cradle, p.
Page 186 - There is as yet, however, no proof, that these micrococci are the cause of the disease. Their presence in the exposed dead tissue is no evidence, for the membrane represents but the necrotic mucous lining.
Page 86 - C., varying with the nature of the cultivating medium. tion kills it in a few days (or at the latest in a few weeks in larger masses not quite dry in the interior).
Page 152 - ... case is worth many pounds of cure. The modern history of our knowledge of this disease is largely a recital of the achievements of Prof. Koch and his influence on the work of other modern investigators, and may be divided into three chief epochs, the first dates from his modest announcement, in 1882, that he had traced tuberculosis to the presence of a bacterial parasite. Seldom, if ever, had any medical discovery been received immediately with such intense interest, and yet the ground at that...

Bibliographic information