Rogue Planet

Front Cover
Arrow, 2001 - Life on other planets - 341 pages
21 Reviews
Rogue Planet is an unforgettable journey stretching from the farthest reaches of known space to the battlefield of a young boy's heart, where a secret struggle is being waged that will decide the fate of billions. That boy is twelve-year-old Anakin Skywalker. The Force is strong in Anakin so strong that the Jedi Council, despite misgivings, entrusted the young Jedi Knight Obi-Wan Kenobi with the mission of training him to become a Jedi Knight. Obi-Wan - like his slain Master, Qui-Gon - believes Anakin may be the chosen one, the Jedi destined to bring balance to the Force. But first Obi-Wan must help his undisciplined, idealistic apprentice, who still bears the scars of slavery, find his own balance. Dispatched to the mysterious planet Zonama Sekot, source of the fastest ships in the galaxy, Obi-Wan and Anakin are swept up in a swirl of deadly intrigue and betrayal. For there are others who covet the power such superfast ships could bring. Raith Siener, a brilliant but unscrupulous weapons and ship designer, has the brains to decipher the Zonama Sekot ship design. Commander Wilhuff Tarkin has at his disposal the forces of the mighty Trader Federation with which to extract the secret. Together, they make a formidable foe, one a small and undeveloped planet can hardly hope to stand against. But as Tarkin's fleet strikes with all its brutal power, Obi-Wan and Anakin sense a dist

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The writing style is like this throughout the book. - Goodreads
I was also quite disappointed with the ending. - Goodreads
The plot is a bit strange and arbitrary. - Goodreads
This was my introduction to his work. - Goodreads
I put his name down for future reference. - Goodreads

Review: Rogue Planet (Star Wars)

User Review  - Pierre Ghazarian - Goodreads

I'm heavily biased by my love for Star Wars, but I loved this book. The prose flows quickly and effortlessly, surprisingly, even the descriptions, which can become daunting in sci-fi, are embedded ... Read full review

Review: Rogue Planet (Star Wars)

User Review  - Nathan Vani - Goodreads

Kind of a boring Star Wars read to be honest ! The book starts off well with a mysterious plot and seems to want to build up to a fantastic ending but it just.... falls apart. Was difficult to follow ... Read full review

About the author (2001)

Greg Bear was born in San Diego, California, on August 20, 1951. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from San Diego State University in 1973. At age 14, he began submitting pieces to magazines and at 15 he sold his first story to Robert Lowndes' Famous Science Fiction. It would be five years before he sold another piece, but by 23 he was selling stories regularly. He has written more than 30 science fiction and fantasy books and has won numerous awards for his work. In 1984, Hardfought and Blood Music won the Nebula Awards for best novella and novelette; Blood Music went on to win the Hugo Award. The novel version of that story, also called Blood Music, won the Prix Apollo in France. In 1987, Tangents won the Hugo and Nebula awards for best short story. He also won a Nebula in 1994 for Moving Mars and in 2001 for Darwin's Radio. Both Dinosaur Summer and Darwin's Radio have been awarded the Endeavour for best novel published by a Northwest science fiction author. He is also an illustrator and his work has appeared in Galaxy, Fantasy and Science Fiction, and Vertex, and in both hardcover and paperback books. He was a founding member of ASFA, the Association of Science Fiction Artists. His works include City at the End of Time, Hull Zero Three, The Mongoliad, Mariposa, Halo: Cryptum, Halo: Primordium and Halo: Silentium.

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