Temple Treasures of Japan (Google eBook)

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F.F. Sherman, 1914 - Art - 334 pages
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Page 245 - ... of the form of drinking; it is a religion of the art of life. The beverage grew to be an excuse for the worship of purity and refinement, a sacred function at which the host and guest joined to produce for that occasion the utmost beatitude of the mundane. The tearoom was an oasis in the dreary waste of existence where weary travellers could meet to drink from the common spring of art-appreciation. The ceremony was an improvised drama whose plot was woven about the tea, the flowers, and the paintings.
Page 228 - ... course the Imperial Palaces. Their roofs seemed to pierce the sky and their balconies to touch the clouds. A lofty hall revealed itself at every fifth step and another at every tenth. No poet or man of letters could view these beauties unmoved. In the park, weeping willows, plum-trees, peachtrees, and pines were cleverly planted so as to enhance the charm of the artificial hills. Rocks shaped like whales, sleeping tigers, dragons or phoenixes, were placed around the lake, where Mandarin ducks...
Page 231 - In the eastern part of the city stood the Karasu-maru Palace built by Yoshimasa during his youth. It was scarcely less magnificent. Then there was the Fujiwara Palace of Sanjo, where the mother of the late Shogun was born.
Page 112 - And whoso will, from Pride released, Contemning neither creed nor priest, May feel the Soul of all the East About him at Kamakura.
Page 244 - Father, there is nothing more to be done. The steps have been washed for the third time, the stone lanterns and the trees are well sprinkled with water, moss and lichens are shining with a fresh verdure; not a twig, not a leaf have I left on the ground." " Young fool," chided the 87 tea-master, " that is not the way a garden path should be swept.
Page 245 - The ceremony was an improvised drama whose plot was woven about the tea, the flowers, and the paintings. Not a colour to disturb the tone of the room, not a sound to mar the rhythm of things, not a gesture to obtrude on the harmony, not a word to break the unity of the surroundings, all movements to be performed simply and naturally such were the aims of the tea-ceremony.
Page 228 - The finest edifices were of course the Imperial Palaces. Their roofs seemed to pierce the sky and their balconies to touch the clouds. A lofty hall revealed itself at every fifth step and another at every tenth. No poet or man of letters could view these beauties unmoved. In the park, weeping willows, plum-trees, peach-trees, and pines were cleverly planted so as to enhance the charm of the artificial hills. Rocks shaped like whales, sleeping tigers, dragons or phoenixes, were...
Page 313 - Eight Beauties of Omi are: the Autumn Moon seen from Ishiyama, the Evening Snow on Hirayama, the Sunset Glow at Seta, the Evening Bell of Miidera, the Boats sailing back from Yabase, a Bright Sky with a Breeze at Awazu, Rain by Night at Karasaki, and the Wild-geese alighting at Katnta.
Page 53 - It is not that reproduction of the features is difficult; the difficulty lies in painting the springs of action hidden in the heart. The face of a great man may resemble that of a mean man, but their hearts (will not be alike. Therefore, to paint a likeness which does not exhibit these heart-impulses, leaving it an open question whether the sitter is a great man or a mean man, is to be unskilled in the art of portraiture.
Page 211 - ... the great seated Kwannon, shrouded in rich lace, of which we have dozens of replicas made during the Tang and the Sung dynasties. This type in Japan is usually ascribed to Godoshi ; but I believe that to be a mistake, quite like the mistake of ascribing, say, all sixteenth-century Japanese paintings to Motonobu. The one name we know is used to cover a multitude of styles. The largest and perhaps finest replica of the Enriuhon type of Kwannon is the great painted kakemono, ascribed to Godoshi,...

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