Lectures on the Early History of Institutions (Google eBook)

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H. Holt, 1875 - Comparative law - 412 pages
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Page 365 - LAW, in its most general and comprehensive sense, signifies a rule of action ; and is applied indiscriminately to all kinds of action, whether animate or inanimate, rational or irrational.
Page 342 - If a determinate human superior, not in the habit of obedience to a like superior, receive habitual obedience from the bulk of a given society, that determinate superior is sovereign in that society...
Page 18 - It is a rule of right unwritten, but delivered by tradition from one to another, in which oftentimes there appeareth great show of equity, in determining the right between party and party, but in many things repugning quite both to God's law and man's...
Page 294 - Notice precedes every distress in the case of the inferior grades, except it be by persons of distinction or upon persons of distinction. Fasting precedes distress in their case. He who does not give a pledge to fasting is an evader of all ; he who disregards all things shall not be paid by God or man.
Page 72 - From the moment when a tribal community settles down finally upon a definite space of land, the Land begins to be the basis of society in place of the Kinship.
Page 353 - the vast mass of influences, which we may call for shortness moral, perpetually shapes, limits, or forbids the actual direction of the forces of society by its sovereign.
Page 224 - ... establishes itself for the first time as the basis of common political action. It may be affirmed then of early commonwealths that their citizens considered all the groups in which they claimed membership to be founded on common lineage.
Page 57 - There are three periods at which the world dies : the period of a plague, of a general war, of the dissolution of verbal contracts.
Page 25 - For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves.
Page 22 - It is better to do so," said Patrick. It was then that all the professors of the sciences in Erin were assembled, and each of them exhibited his art before Patrick, in the presence of every chief in Erin. It was then...

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