Persuasion (Google eBook)

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J. M. Dent, 1895 - 261 pages
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User Review  - equusregia - LibraryThing

My favorite by Austen, one of my favorite books of any kind. Autumnal, mature, with main characters who have both had to grow up and come into themselves before they can repair their relationship ... Read full review

Review: Persuasion (Penguin Longman Reader Bk/Tape)

User Review  - Victor - Goodreads

A beautiful story! Read full review

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Page 236 - We certainly do not forget you so soon as you forget us. It is, perhaps, our fate rather than our merit. We cannot help ourselves. We live at home, quiet, confined, and our feelings prey upon us. You are forced on exertion. You have always a profession, pursuits, "business of some sort or other, to take you back into the world immediately, and continual occupation and change soon weaken impressions.
Page 2 - Vanity was the beginning and the end of Sir Walter Elliot's character — vanity of person and of situation. He had been remarkably handsome in his youth, and, at fifty-four, was still a very fine man. Few women could think more of their personal appearance than he did, nor could the valet of any new made lord be more delighted with the place he held in society. He considered the blessing of beauty as inferior only to the blessing of a baronetcy; and the Sir Walter Elliot, who united these gifts,...
Page 60 - Charles shewed himself at the window, all was ready, their visitor had bowed and was gone, the Miss Musgroves were gone too, suddenly resolving to walk to the end of the village with the sportsmen ; the room was cleared, and Anne might finish her breakfast as she could. " It is over ! it is over ! " she repeated to herself again and again, in nervous gratitude.
Page 86 - ... the ploughs at work, and the fresh made path spoke the farmer counteracting the sweets of poetical despondence, and meaning to have spring again, they gained the summit of the most considerable hill...
Page 112 - By this time the report of the accident had spread among the workmen and boatmen about the Cobb, and many were collected near them, to be useful if wanted; at any rate, to enjoy the sight of a dead young lady, — nay, two dead young ladies, for it proved twice as fine as the first report.
Page 61 - Frederick- Wentworth had used such words, or something like them, but without an idea that they would be carried round to her. He had thought her wretchedly altered, and, in the first moment of appeal, had spoken as he felt He had not forgiven Anne Elliot She had used him ill...
Page 27 - The belief of being prudent and selfdenying, principally for his advantage, was her chief consolation under the misery of a parting, a final parting; and every consolation was required, for she had to encounter all the additional pain of opinions, on his side, totally unconvinced and unbending, and of his feeling himself illused by so forced a relinquishment.
Page 41 - Hall were treated as of such general publicity and pervading interest; yet with all this experience, she believed she must now submit to feel that another lesson, in the art of knowing our own nothingness beyond our own circle, was become necessary for her...
Page 89 - This nut," he continued, with playful solemnity, " while so many of its brethren have fallen and been trodden under foot, is still in possession of all the happiness that a hazel nut can be supposed capable of." Then returning to his former earnest tone — " My first wish for all whom I am interested in, is that they should be firm. If Louisa Musgrove would be beautiful and happy in her November of life, she will cherish all her present powers of mind.
Page 239 - I hope I do justice to all that is felt by you, and by those who resemble you. God forbid that I should undervalue the warm and faithful feelings of any of my fellow-creatures! I should deserve utter contempt if I dared to suppose that true attachment and constancy were known only by woman. No, I believe you capable of everything great and good in your married lives. I believe you equal to every important exertion, and to every domestic forbearance, so long as— if I may be allowed the expression—...

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