The History of the Blues: The Roots, the Music, the People

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Da Capo Press, 2003 - Music - 309 pages
4 Reviews
Francis Davis's The History of the Blues is a groundbreaking rethinking of the blues that fearlessly examines how race relations have altered perceptions of the music. Tracing its origins from the Mississippi Delta to its amplification in Chicago right after World War II, Davis argues for an examination of the blues in its own right, not just as a precursor to jazz and rock 'n' roll. The lives of major figures such as Robert Johnson, Charlie Patton, and Leadbelly, in addition to contemporary artists such as Stevie Ray Vaughan and Robert Cray, are examined and skillfully woven into a riveting, provocative narrative.
  

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Review: The History Of The Blues: The Roots, The Music, The People

User Review  - Richard Staines - Goodreads

I f you want to know about the blues, it's history, the characters, the names, then this is a great book. I liked it at least. Though for me by the time we get to BB King and beyond I'm not so ... Read full review

Review: The History Of The Blues: The Roots, The Music, The People

User Review  - Bubba - Goodreads

eh.....it's an ok intro to the blues, but even some of the greats only get a few paragraphs. The author, who seems to know Jazz, Rock and Roll, C&W, Rap, Ragtime and R&B as well as Blues, spends much ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Francis Davis is a contributing editor of the Atlantic Monthly and writes regularly for the New York Times and the New Yorker. He is the author of the acclaimed books Outcats and History of the Blues and a biography of John Coltrane (Knopf). He lives in Philadelphia.

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