Things you ought to know about yourself; or, Sketches of human physiology (Google eBook)

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Page 98 - For take an example of a dog, and mark what a generosity and courage he will put on when he finds himself maintained by a man, who to him is instead of a God, or melior natura, which courage is manifestly such as that creature, without that confidence, of a better nature than his own could never attain. i io OF ATHEISM. So man, when he resteth and assureth himself upon divine protection and favour, gathereth a force and faith which human nature in itself could not obtain.
Page 59 - Thus with the year Seasons return, but not to me returns Day, or the sweet approach of even or morn, Or sight of vernal bloom, or summer's rose, Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine; But cloud instead, and ever-during dark Surrounds me...
Page 60 - And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out. So much the rather thou, celestial Light, Shine inward, and the mind through all her powers Irradiate ; there plant eyes, all mist from thence Purge and disperse, that I may see and tell Of things invisible to mortal sight.
Page 97 - They that deny a God destroy man's nobility ; for certainly man is of kin to the beasts by his body ; and if he be not of kin to God by his spirit, he is a base and ignoble creature.
Page 60 - How precious also are thy thoughts unto me, O God! How great is the sum of them ! If I should count them, they are more in number than the sand : When I awake, I am still with thee.
Page 97 - God, but those for whom it maketh that there were no God. It appeareth in nothing more, that atheism is rather in the lip than in the heart of man, than by this, that atheists will ever be talking of that their opinion,. as if they fainted in it within themselves...
Page 98 - Being, whose justice, goodness, wisdom, and veracity, are all concerned in this great point. But among these and other excellent arguments for the immortality of the soul, there is one drawn from the perpetual progress of the soul to its perfection, without a possibility of ever arriving at it...
Page 98 - Are such abilities made for no purpose ? A brute arrives at a point of perfection that he can never pass : in a few years he has all the endowments he is...
Page 107 - Crown 8vo, cloth, 8s. 6d. Tim Doolan, the Irish Emigrant : being a full and particular Account of his Reasons for Emigrating —His Passage across the Atlantic — His Arrival in New York— His brief Sojourn in the United States, and his further Emigration to Canada. By same Author.
Page 13 - Twas a skull Once of ethereal spirit full. This narrow cell was Life's retreat, This space was Thought's mysterious seat. What beauteous visions filled this spot, What dreams of pleasure long forgot? Nor hope, nor joy, nor love, nor fear, Have left one trace of record here.

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