England among the nations [chapters from Money and morals, ed. by M.A. Lalor]. (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1864
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 87 - In the youth of a state, arms do flourish ; in the middle age of a state, learning ; and then both of them together for a time ; in the declining age of a state, mechanical arts and merchandise.
Page 108 - ... quackery, and especially of puffing ; but nobody seems to have remarked, that these are the inevitable outgrowth of immense competition — of a state of society where any voice, not pitched in an exaggerated key, is lost in the hubbub. Success, in so crowded a field, depends not upon what a person is, but upon what he seems : mere marketable qualities become the object instead of substantial ones...
Page 83 - ... and represented that he was almost exhausted with fatigue ; the Admiral would reply, ' I fear you are. You have need of rest ; so go to bed, Clavell, and I will watch by myself.
Page 108 - ... any voice, not pitched in an exaggerated key, is lost in the hubbub. Success, in so crowded a field, depends not upon what a person is, but upon what he seems : mere marketable qualities become the object instead of substantial ones, and a man's labour and capital are expended less in doing anything than in persuading other people that he has done it.
Page 108 - It is our own age which has seen the honest dealer driven to quackery, by hard necessity, and the certainty of being undersold by the dishonest. For the first time, arts for attracting public attention form a necessary part of the qualifications even of the deserving ; and skill in these goes farther than any other quality towards insuring success. The same intensity of competition drives the trading public more and more to play high for success, to throw for all or nothing.
Page 48 - ... on the opposite side, always avoiding them, and seldom failing to strike down one or more hoops in every course. Blackall could not understand how it was. He was not aware what a well-practised eye, good nerves, and a firm will could accomplish. Ernest's father had instilled into him the principle, that whatever is worth doing at all, is worth doing as well as it can be done. So, when he took a hoop in his hand, he considered how he could use it to the best advantage ; and from the first, he...
Page 107 - There has been much complaint of late years, of the growth, both in the world of trade and in that of intellect, of quackery, and especially of puffing: but nobody seems to have remarked, that these are the inevitable fruits of immense competition; of a state of society where any voice, not pitched in an exaggerated key, is lost in the hubbub. Success, in so crowded a field, depends not upon what a person is, but upon what he seems: mere marketable qualities become the object instead of substantial...
Page 107 - April, 1836, and which was attributed to Mr Mill. " There has been much complaint of late years of the growth, both in the world of trade and in that of intellect, of quackery, and especially of puffing ; but nobody seems to have remarked, that these are the inevitable outgrowth of immense competition — of a state of society where any voice, not pitched in an exaggerated key, is lost in the hubbub. Success, in so crowded a field, depends not upon what a person is...
Page 25 - The war-drums throb no longer, and the battle flags be furled In the parliament of Man, the federation of the world...
Page 100 - Grecian chivalry—the narrative of the most brilliant struggle that the world has seen ? of moral discipline and daring, with gigantic brutal force. Thucydides is an antithesis from end to end. Livy tells us how the bloodhound cub, was born and how it grew, amid every sort of danger, from its suckling time in the wolfs den till its matured ferocity, when every leaf in the forests of Asia and of Gaul had learned to tremble at its imperial howl. Polybius, too, had the same canvas to tint, though his...

Bibliographic information