Live Stock and Dairy Farming: A Non-technical Manual for the Successful Breeding, Care and Management of Farm Animals, the Dairy Herd, and the Essentials of Dairy Production (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John C. Winston Company, 1918 - Dairying - 196 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 113 - JUDGING.1 1 Head. 2 Muzzle. 3 Nostril. 4 Face. 5 Eye. 6 Forehead. 7 Horn. 8 Ear. 9 Cheek. 10 Throat. 11 Neck. 12 Withers. 13 Back. 14 Loins. 15 Hip Bone. 16 Pelvic Arch. 17 Rump. 18 Tail. 19 Switch. 20 Chest. 21 Brisket. 22 Dewlap. 23 Shoulder. 24 Elbow. 25 Forearm. 26 Knee. 27 Ankle. 28 Hoof. 29 Heart Girth. 30 Side or Barrel. 31 Belly. 32 Flank. 33 Milk Vein. 34 Fore Udder. 35...
Page 144 - Never add an animal to the herd until certain it is free from disease, especially tuberculosis. 2. Never allow a cow to be excited by hard driving, abuse, loud talking, or unnecessary disturbances; do not unduly expose her to cold or storms. 3. Clean the entire body of the cow daily. Hair in the region of the udder should be kept short. Wipe the udder and surrounding parts with a clean, damp cloth before milking.
Page 121 - Manipulation. The glands are pressed together from the side. The fore quarters are milked each by itself by placing one hand, with fingers spread, on the outside of the quarter and the other hand in the division between the right and left fore quarters; the hands are pressed against each other and the teat then milked. When no more milk is obtained by this manipulation, the hind quarters are milked by placing a hand on the outside of each quarter, likewise with fingers spread and turned upward,...
Page 144 - The presence of flies may be reduced by darkening the stable and removing the manure as directed below. 9. The floor, walls, and ceilings of the stable should be tight, walls and ceilings being kept free of cobwebs and whitewashed twice a year. There should be as few dust-catching ledges and projections as possible. 10. Allow no musty or dirty litter or strong-smelling material in the stable. Store manure under cover at least 40 feet from the stable in a dark place.
Page 121 - ... the fore quarter, the thumbs being placed on the outside of the udder and the four fingers in the division between the two halves of the udder. The hands are now pressed toward each other and at the same time lifted toward the body of the cow. This pressing and lifting is repeated three times, the milk collected in the milk cistern is then milked out, and the manipulation repeated until no more milk is obtained in this way, when the left quarters are treated in the same manner. (See Fig. ...
Page 121 - Second Manipulation: The glands are pressed together from the side. The fore quarters are milked each by itself by placing one hand, with fingers spread, on the outside of the quarter and the other hand in the division between the right and left fore quarters; the hands are pressed against each other and the teat then milked. When no more milk is obtained by this manipulation, the hind quarters are milked by placing a hand on the outside of each quarter, likewise with fingers spread and turned upward,...
Page 122 - The fore teats are grasped with partly closed hands and lifted with a push toward the body of the cow, both at the same time, by which method the glands are pressed between the hands and the body; the milk is drawn after each three pushes. When the fore teats are emptied, the hind teats are milked in the same manner.
Page 186 - Corn silage2 25.6 Hungarian grass 28.9 Rape 14.3 Rye 23.4 Timothy 38.4 Hay and dry coarse fodders : Alfalfa hay 91.6 Clover hay red .... 84.7 Corn forage field cured . . 57.8 Corn stover 59.5 Cowpea hay 89.3 Hungarian hay 92.3 Oat hay 84.0 Soybean hay 88.7 Timothy hay 86.8 Straws : Oat straw 90.8 Rye straw 92.9 Wheat straw 90.4 Roots and tubers : Carrots 11.4...
Page 121 - ... time is taken) with the left hand on the hind quarter and the right hand in front on the fore quarter, the thumbs being placed on the outside of the udder and the forefingers in the division between the two halves of the udder.
Page 146 - If any part of the milk is bloody, stringy, or unnatural in appearance, or if by accident dirt gets into the milk pail, the whole mess should be rejected. 17. Weigh and record the milk given by each cow. 18. Never mix warm milk with that which has been cooled, and do not allow milk to freeze. 19. Feed no dry, dusty feed just previous to milking. 20. Persons suffering from any disease, or who have been exposed to a contagious disease, must remain away from the cows and the milk. 21. It is needless...

Bibliographic information