The Economics of the British Stage 1800-1914

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 21, 2007 - Business & Economics - 506 pages
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During the nineteenth century, British theatre developed into an industry with considerable importance in the economy, diversified by whole new forms of entertainment - first music hall then cinema - evolving alongside the dramatic stage. This comprehensive study examines the theatre's growth from an economic perspective. Tracy Davis reflects the debates of economic theorists from Adam Smith to Alfred Marshall to investigate three key areas: the state's role in protecting theatre; the factors affecting the success or failure of theatre companies; and how theatre came to be regarded as one of the 'service industries'. By grounding debates about subsidization and the economic viability of the live arts in an era predating government funding, Davis sheds light on the history of cultural policy for the arts in Britain. Her book will interest scholars across a range of disciplines - theatre, social history, economics, gender studies and the sociology of culture.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
COMPETITION THEATRE AND LAISSEZFAIRE
15
Monopoly and free trade fair and unfair competition
17
Property and the stakes of private interest
42
Industrial regulation and safety
70
Marginal economics national interest and the halfnaked woman
115
OWNERSHIP AND ENTREPRENEURIALISM
157
Opportunity finance and failure
159
Gender gentlemanly capitalism and the womanager
273
INDUSTRIALIZATION COMMODITY CAPITALISM AND THEATRE PRODUCTION SYSTEMS
307
Labour and labourers
309
Theatre as cultural capital
334
To the Public Charles Kembles Mercies or the 999 Increasing
363
Notes
367
Bibliography
450
Index
486

Profit
201
Business structures
241

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About the author (2007)

Tracy C. Davis is Barber Professor of the Performing Arts at Northwestern University. She is author of Actresses as Working Women: Their Social Identity in Victorian Culture, George Bernard Shaw and the Socialist Theatre, and The Economics of the British Stage, 1800 1914 and general editor of the Cambridge series Theatre and Performance Theory.

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