The Natural and Civil History of Vermont, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Samuel Mills, 1809 - Natural history
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Page 387 - ... nor can any man be justly deprived or abridged of any civil right, as a citizen, on account of his religious sentiments or peculiar mode of religious worship ; and that no authority can, or ought to be vested in or assumed by any power whatever that shall in any case interfere with or in any manner control the rights of conscience in the free exercise of religious worship...
Page 14 - Hudson's river, and all the lands from the west side of Connecticut river, to the east side of Delaware bay.
Page 443 - ... ermine, to save us from this pollution. I call upon the honour of your lordships, to reverence the dignity of your ancestors, and to maintain your own. I call upon the spirit and humanity of my country, to vindicate the national character. I invoke the genius of the constitution.
Page 166 - Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, FREE AND INDEPENDENT STATES ; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connexion between them and the state of Great Britain* is, and ought to be, totally dissolved...
Page 168 - This convention, whose members are duly chosen by the free voice of their constituents, in the several towns on the New Hampshire Grants, in public meeting assembled, in our names, and in behalf of our constituents, do hereby proclaim and publicly declare, that the district of territory comprehending and usually known by the name and description of the New Hampshire Grants...
Page 131 - M'Crea, a young lady, lovely to the sight, of virtuous character, and amiable disposition, engaged to an officer of your army, was, with other women and children, taken out of a house near fort Edward, carried into the woods, and there scalped and mangled in a most shocking manner.
Page 247 - That the said acts and proceedings of the said people, being highly derogatory to the" authority of the United States, and dangerous to the confederacy, require the immediate and decided interposition of Congress, for the protection and relief of such as have suffered by them, and for preserving peace in the said district, until a decision shall be had of the controversy, relative to the jurisdiction of the same.
Page 154 - He is apprised of the superiority of your numbers, and the disposition of your troops to impede his supplies, and render his retreat a scene of carnage on both sides. In this situation he is impelled by humanity, and thinks himself justified, by established principles and precedents of state and war, to spare the lives of brave men upon honourable terms.
Page 219 - Resolved, that it be an indispensable preliminary to the recognition of the independence of the people inhabiting the territory called Vermont and their admission into the Federal Union, that they explicitly relinquish all demands of lands or jurisdiction the east side of the west bank of Connecticut River...
Page 205 - I do not hesitate to say, I am fully grounded in opinion, that Vermont has an indubitable right to agree on terms of a cessation of hostilities with Great Britain, provided the United States persist in rejecting her application for a union with them...

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