Autobiographical Notes of the Life of William Bell Scott: And Notices of His Artistic and Poetic Circle of Friends, 1830 to 1882, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Harper & Brothers, 1892 - Poets, English
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Page 77 - How loudly his sweet voice he rears! He loves to talk with marineres That come from a far countree. He kneels at morn, and noon, and eve He hath a cushion plump: It is the moss that wholly hides The rotted old oak-stump. The skiff-boat neared: I heard them talk, "Why, this is strange, I trow! Where are those lights so many and fair, That signal made but now?
Page 54 - AND the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, See, I have called by name Bezaleel the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah : and I have filled him with the spirit of God, in wisdom, and in understanding, and in knowledge, and in all manner of workmanship...
Page 345 - And Abraham said unto his eldest servant of his house, that ruled over all that he had, Put, I pray thee, thy hand under my thigh : and I will make thee swear by the LORD, the God of heaven, and the God of the earth, that thou shalt not take a wife unto my son of the daughters of the Canaanites, among whom I dwell : but thou shalt go unto my country and to my kindred, and take a wife unto my son Isaac.
Page 247 - By the window was a high narrow reading-desk, at which stood writing a slight girl with a serious regular profile, dark against the pallid wintry light without. This most interesting to me of the two inmates turned on my entrance, made the most formal and graceful curtsey, and resumed her writing, and the old gentleman signed to a chair for my sitting down...
Page 241 - ... has supplied us with a standard of excellence, and has increased our respect for the resources of God who thus sends a real person to outgo our ideal ; when he has, moreover, become an object of thought, and, whilst his character retains all its unconscious effect, is converted in the mind into solid and sweet wisdom, it is a sign to us that his office is closing, and he is commonly withdrawn from our sight in a short time.
Page 294 - Drama has nothing particular to say except that it seems to bear vaguely towards the favourite doctrine that scoundrelism is a sacred probation of the soul. But I find this everywhere. I am reading Wilhelm Meister, where the hero's self-culture is a great process, amusing and amazing one. On one page he is in despair about some girl he has been the death of ; in the next you are delighted with his enlarged views of Hamlet. Nothing, plainly, is so fatal to the duty of self-culture as self-sacrifice,...
Page 241 - When much intercourse with a friend has supplied us with a standard of excellence, and has increased our respect for the resources of God who thus sends a real person to outgo our ideal; when he has, moreover, become an object of thought, and, whilst his character retains all its unconscious effect, is converted in the mind into solid and sweet wisdom - it is a sign to us that his...
Page 349 - However true it may have been, or still may be, that one half of the world does not know how the other half lives, it is a libel upon the curiosity of mankind to attribute this ignorance to indifference.
Page 248 - As the short day was already spent, I could not go there at once. The old gentleman's pronunciation of English was very Italian, and though I did not know that both of them he and his daughter were probably at that moment writing poetry of some sort and might wish me far enough, I left very soon.
Page 150 - A daisy disf a dis ! Come all ye pretty maidens And dance along with this. And you shall have a duck so blue, And you shall have a drake, And you shall have a pretty young-man A dancing for your sake.

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