The Rambler [by S. Johnson and others]. (Google eBook)

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Page 188 - ... for that help which could not now be given him ; and many spent their last moments in cautioning others against the folly by which they were intercepted in the midst of their course.
Page 93 - But drive far off the barbarous dissonance Of Bacchus and his revellers, the race Of that wild rout that tore the Thracian bard In Rhodope, where woods and rocks had ears To rapture, till the savage clamour drown'd Both harp and voice ; nor could the muse defend Her son.
Page 188 - This necessity of perishing might have been expected to sadden the gay, and intimidate the daring, at least to keep the melancholy and timorous in perpetual torments, and hinder them from any enjoyment of the varieties and gratifications which nature offered them as the solace of their labours ; yet in effect none seemed less to expect destruction than those to whom it was most dreadful ; they all had the art of...
Page 190 - ... out from the rocks of Pleasure, that they were unable to continue their...
Page 124 - At once on the eastern cliff of Paradise He lights ; and to his proper shape returns A seraph wing'd : six wings he wore, to shade His lineaments divine ; the pair that clad Each shoulder broad came mantling o'er his breast With regal ornament ; the middle pair Girt like a starry zone his waist, and round Skirted his loins and thighs with downy gold, And colours dipp'd in heaven ; the third his feet Shadow'd from either heel with feather'd mail Sky-tinctured grain.
Page 145 - THE reader is indebted for this day's entertainment to an author from whom the age has received greater favours, who has enlarged the knowledge of human nature, and taught the passions to move at the command of virtue.
Page 187 - ... but a little way. It appeared to be full of rocks and whirlpools, for many sunk unexpectedly while they were courting the gale with full sails, and insulting those whom they had left behind.
Page 190 - ... rotations, towards the centre. She then repented her temerity, and with all her force endeavoured to retreat ; but the draught of the...
Page 112 - Rapidity, as to be equal only to one long; they, therefore, naturally exhibit the Act of passing through a Long space in a short Time.
Page 6 - Whoever commits a fraud is guilty not only of the particular injury to him whom he deceives, but of the diminution of that confidence which constitutes not only the ease but the existence of society.

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