The history of the reign of George III.: To which is prefixed, A view of the progressive improvement of England, in prosperity and strength, to the accession of His Majesty, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1828 - History - 23 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 127 - Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Briton; and the peculiar happiness of my life will ever consist in promoting the welfare of a people, whose loyalty and warm affection to me I consider as the greatest and most permanent security of my throne...
Page 473 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy! Pressed down as I am by the hand of infirmity, I am little able to assist my country in this most perilous conjuncture; but, my Lords, while...
Page 161 - Duke of Cornwall and Rothsay, Earl of Carrick, Baron of Renfrew, Lord of the Isles, and Great Steward of Scotland, Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester.
Page 469 - An Act for removing all doubts and apprehensions concerning taxation by the Parliament of Great Britain, in any of the colonies, provinces, and plantations in North America, and the West Indies; and for repealing so much of an Act, made in the seventh year of the reign of His present Majesty, as imposes a duty on tea imported from Great Britain into any colony or plantation in America, or relates thereto...
Page 309 - An act for the impartial administration of justice in the cases of persons questioned for any acts done by them in the execution of the law, or for the suppression of riots and tumults, in the province of Massachusetts Bay, in New England.
Page 349 - The question with me is, not whether you have a right to render your people miserable, but whether it is not your interest to make them happy. It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do, but what humanity, reason and justice tell me I ought to do.
Page 25 - England, the articles in it merit particular attention, as they unfold the ideas of that age, with respect to the nature of such settlements. Elizabeth authorises him to discover and take possession of all remote and barbarous lands, unoccupied by any Christian prince or people.
Page 605 - I shall take such measures as shall appear to me to be most conducive to the restoration of harmony between Great Britain and the revolted colonies...
Page 340 - Every motive, therefore, of justice and of policy, of dignity and of prudence, urges you to allay the ferment in America, by a removal of your troops from Boston, by a repeal of your acts of parliament, and by demonstration of amicable dispositions towards your colonies.
Page 327 - That your majesty may enjoy every felicity through a long and glorious reign, over loyal and happy subjects, and that your descendants may inherit your prosperity and dominions till time shall be no more, is, and always will be, our sincere and fervent prayer.

Bibliographic information