Being "Dutch" in the Indies: A History of Creolisation and Empire, 1500-1920

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NUS Press, 2008 - History - 439 pages
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Being "Dutch" in the Indies portrays Dutch colonial territories in Asia not as mere societies under foreign occupation but rather as a "Creole empire." Most of colonial society, up to the highest levels, consisted of people of mixed Dutch and Asian descent who were born in the Indies and considered it their home, but were legally Dutch. They played a major role in the plantation industry, commerce, local government, and even early anti-colonial nationalism. The old world came to an end after World War 1, when people born in Europe began to dominate government and business, and Indonesian nationalism rejected the Creole notion of imperial belonging. In telling the story of the Creole empire, the authors draw on government archives, newspapers, and literary works as well as genealogical studies that follow the fortunes of individual families over several generations. They also critically analyze theories relating to culturally and racially mixed communities. The picture of the Indies they develop shatters conventional understandings of colonial rule in Asia.
  

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Contents

Separation and Fusion
1
The Baggage of Colonialism
26
Contraction
66
Lordly Traditions and Plantation Industrialism
104
Mixed Worlds in the Eastern Archipelago
143
Rank and Status
184
The Underclass
219
Crisis and Change in the Indische World
258
Defined and Identified
293
End of an Old World
339
Notes
348
Bibliography
392
Index
421
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Ulbe Bosma is Senior Researcher at the International Institute of Social History and Professor of International Comparative Social History at the Free University of Amsterdam. He is coauthor of Being 'Dutch' in the Indies: A History of Creolisation and Empire, 1500 1920 (with Remco Raben, 2008).

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