Ahead of the Curve: Two Years at Harvard Business School (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Jul 31, 2008 - Business & Economics - 304 pages
26 Reviews
Two years in the cauldron of capitalism-"horrifying and very funny" (The Wall Street Journal)

In this candid and entertaining insider's look at the most influential school in global business, Philip Delves Broughton draws on his crack reporting skills to describe his madcap years at Harvard Business School. Ahead of the Curve recounts the most edifying and surprising lessons learned in the quest for an MBA, from the ingenious chicanery of leveraging and the unlikely pleasures of accounting, to the antics of the "booze luge" and other, less savory trappings of student culture. Published during the one hundredth anniversary of Harvard Business School, this is the unflinching truth about life in the trenches of an iconic American institution.


  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - walterqchocobo - LibraryThing

This was an excellent account of two years at the Harvard School of Business written by a journalist from the UK. I have a business degree from undergrad and have no interest in going back for more ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wjmcomposer - LibraryThing

I thought this book was very interesting, and reasonably well-written. I think it behooves those wishing to understand why modern American business doesn't always (or ever) operate according to the ... Read full review

Contents

Title Page
Chapter Two STARTING OVER
Chapter Four RIDING THE BOOZE LUGE
Chapter Six FORMIN STORMIN NORMIN PERFORMIN
Chapter Eight THE RISK MASTER
Chapter Ten ETHICAL JIHADISTS
Chapter Eleven EXTREME LEVERAGE
Chapter Twelve CHASING THE CURVE
Chapter Thirteen BIG HAIRY GOALS
Chapter Fifteen GRADUATION
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About the author (2008)

Philip Delves Broughton was born in Bangladesh and grew up in England. From 1998-2004, he served successively as the New York and Paris bureau chief for The Daily Telegraph of London and reported widely from North and South America, Europe and Africa. He led the Telegraph’s coverage of the 9/11 attacks on New York and his reporting has twice been nominated for the British Press Awards. His work has also appeared in the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Times of London, and the Spectator. In 2006, he received his MBA from Harvard Business School. He currently lives in New York with his wife and two sons.

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