An Architectural Guidebook to Portland

Front Cover
Gibbs Smith, 2001 - Architecture - 310 pages
2 Reviews

A graceful combination of eccentric and traditional architecture.

Portland, Oregon, is a city widely known for its civic planning, preservation of historic buildings, attractiveness, and inviting atmosphere.

Within the five-mile downtown district can be found skyscrapers, nineteenth-century cast-iron-front buildings, a riverfront park, old brick warehouses and breweries still in operation, a train station with a 150-foot clock tower, five bridges, and a rich assortment of museums, government buildings, and shops. With more than 250 entries, this comprehensive guide includes the following:

Pioneer Courthouse

Union Station

Chinese Classical Garden

U.S. Bancorp Tower

Historic Bridges

U.S. National Bank Building

Additional updates and expanded information can be found at: teleport.com/ kilm2/home.html

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Review: Architectural Guidebook to Portland, An

User Review  - tim - Goodreads

Overall, I really enjoyed this well-researched book on Portland's major buildings and bridges. Copious facts abound on the myriad architectural trends, past and present, that have contributed to this ... Read full review

Review: Architectural Guidebook to Portland, An

User Review  - Alyson - Goodreads

I LOVE this book. It has awesome info. Like today I learned that the Morgan Building (on Broadway) is on top of an old grave yard, and there are most likely bodies beneath the blocks. EEKS! And maybe my old apartment building. A must read for anyone who loves Portland. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
DowntownCourthouse Square and Environs 1
DowntownPark Blocks 59
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Bart King is the author of The Big Book of Boy Stuff, The Big Book of Girl Stuff and The Pocket Guide to Mischief. A longtime middle school teacher, Bart lives in Portland, Oregon, where he invents new sock designs and plays in a kazoo jazz quartet.

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