Media Violence and Children: A Complete Guide for Parents and Professionals (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Douglas A. Gentile
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2003 - Psychology - 328 pages
1 Review

The foremost experts in the field of media violence research present a broad range of approaches and findings to confirm what has long been suspected: media violence has profoundly negative effects on children. The contributors share concise and readable summaries of the most recent research—along with research conducted over the past 40 years—regarding the effects of violence in various media, including: television, film, video games, music, and the Internet.

Scientifically documented negative effects on children include the aggressor effect, the victim effect, the bystander effect, and the appetite effect. Future steps to reduce the danger of media violence are also presented. This cross-disciplinary approach to media violence offers readers the most complete, up-to-date, and holistic understanding of the topic. Gentile and his contributors also examine and debunk long-held misconceptions about media violence, explaining the specific nature and unquestionable power of the negative effects.

  

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Gentile does not present an agenda driven by science, but science driven by an agenda. It seems that his life's mission is to prove - despite a lack of rigorous evidence - a causal link between actual violence and violent gameplay. His agenda-driven approach is evidenced by his uncritical, assumed-to-be-correct-with-little-consideration-of-alternative-explanations approach to the matter. His career rides on the fact that it is nearly impossible to prove a negative, such as the fact that bigfoot does not exist. Just keep looking, though, Gentile. Maybe someday you'll find your bigfoot! 

Contents

II
1
III
19
IV
39
V
57
VI
107
VII
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VIII
153
IX
171
X
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XI
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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Copyright

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Page 3 - Violence is defined as any overt depiction of a credible threat of physical force or the actual use of such force intended to physically harm an animate being or a group of beings. Violence also includes certain depictions of physically harmful consequences against an animate being (or group of beings) that occur as a result of unseen violent means.

About the author (2003)

DOUGLAS A. GENTILE is Director of Research for the National Institute on Media and the Family. A developmental psychologist, he is also a faculty member in the Psychology Department at Iowa State University.

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