The Development of Chemistry, 1789-1914: Elements of chemistry

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Taylor & Francis, 1998 - Chemistry - 511 pages
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Monumental classic by the founder of modern chemistry features first explicit statement of law of conservation of matter in chemical change, and more. Facsimile reprint of original (1790) Kerr translation.
  

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Contents

Of the Formation and Decomposition
1
CHAP IIGeneral Views relative to the Forma
26
Analysis of Atmospheric Air and
33
CHAP IVNomenclature os the several consti
48
Of the Decomposition of Oxygen
54
Of the Nomenclature of Acids in
66
Of the Decomposition of Oxygen
78
Of the Quantities of Caloric disen
97
SEC T XXIII Observations upon Molibdic Acid
249
Observations upon Malik Acid
256
Observations upon Pyroligrious
261
TABLE of the Combinations of Acetous Acid
266
TABLE of the Combinations of Acetic Acid
271
Observations upon Citric Acid
275
Observations upon Gallic Acid
277
Observations upon Formic Acid
283

Combustion of Wax
105
Observations upon Oxyds and Acids
115
Of the Decomposition of Vegetable
123
Of the Decomposition of Vegetable
141
Of the Formation of Neutral Salts
149
Of Potash Page
151
Of Metallic Bodies
159
INTRODUCTION ibid
175
SECT IIIObservations upon ths Combinations
182
Observations upon these Combina?
185
TABLE of the Combinations of Oxygen with
190
SEC s V Observations upon these Combina
191
TABLE of the Combinations of Hydrogen with
198
TABLE of the Combinations of Phosphorus with
204
Observations upon the Combinations
210
TABLE of the Combinations of Azote in the State
212
Observations upon Sulphuric Acid
219
TABLE of the Combinations of Phosphorous
225
TABLE of the Combinations of Muriatic Acid
231
TABLE of the Combinations of NitroMiiriatic
236
TABLE of the Combinations of Boracic Acid
242
PART III
290
Of the Instruments necessary for deter
295
Of Gazometry or the Measurement
304
Some other methods for Measuring
319
Of the necessary Corrections of the
329
grees of the Thermometer
336
Description of the Calorimeter
343
Of the Mechanical Operations
357
Of the Combustion of Oils Page
426
Of the Combustion of Alkohol
433
VIII Of the Oxydation of Metals
441
TABLE of the Combinations of Pyro lignous
449
Of Deflagration
453
Of the Instruments necessary for Ope
460
Of increasing the Action of Fire
474
APPENDIX
481
No VAdditional Rules for Converting
485
Tables of the Specific Gravities
491
Additional Rules for Calcula
505
Table of the English Cubical Inches
511
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About the author (1998)

Born in Paris of a well-to-do family, Antoine Lavoisier received a good education, and, at an early age, became interested in science. He had an extraordinary ability to make accurate measurements and conduct careful experiments. Lavoisier made the measurement that Robert Boyle had neglected by weighing the tin oxide and the retort (particularly the air inside the retort), and noted that the total system did not gain or lose weight; he then concluded that during the calcination the metal received a substance from the air. Lavoisier realized that the true state of Joseph Priestley's "dephlogistonated air" consists of at least two substances---one that supports combustion, oxygen; and another, nitrogen. On May 8, 1794, Lavoisier was sent to the guillotine because he was part owner of a tax-collecting firm. According to tradition, the presiding judge responded to a plea on Lavoisier's behalf by saying, "The Republic has no need for scientists. Let justice take its course.

Knight is at the University of Durham, UK

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