Making Death Visible: Chechen Female Suicide Bombers in an Era of Globalization

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ProQuest, 2009 - 400 pages
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This dissertation investigates the historical, social and political circumstances that fostered Chechen women's engagement in suicide bombing from 2000 to 2004. Although approximately fifteen percent of suicide bombers worldwide have been female, academic research by and large focuses on male actors. When research does focus on women, it relies on stereotypical conceptions of men as more war-like and women as the weaker sex in order to label women who engage in political violence as deviant. Further, despite the intrinsic involvement of the body in acts of suicide bombing, studies of terrorism often highlight the Cartesian divide between reason and the body, characterizing violent actors either as irrational---crazy with despair---or rational---strategically defending their homeland. In life as lived, however, there is always a linkage among emotional, rational, and physical processes.
  

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Contents

SUICIDE BOMBING IN THEORETICAL CONTEXT
18
Bare Life Ungrievable Populations and Those Whom We Are Able to Torture
40
Resistant Subjectivities and the Advent of Suicide Bombing
51
Conclusion
57
A History
65
History Historical Memory and Stigmatization
78
Conclusion
134
NEWS MEDIA CONSTRUCTION
138
The Psychological Autopsy
212
Chechen Women Militants in Academic Scholarship
231
Conclusion
237
Womens Roles in PostSoviet Chechnya
246
Womens Bodies in RussoChechen Wars
264
Conclusion
287
The Significance of Chechen Women Suicide
294
Effects of War on the Collective in Chechnya
302

The Black Widows Entrance at Dubrovka
150
Figural Effects of Beslan
164
Conclusion
190
A Review of Popular Theories Regarding
197
Chechen Womens Roles in RussoChechen Wars
314
Conclusion
339
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