The works of Benjamin Franklin: with notes and a life of the author by J. Sparks (Google eBook)

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1840
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Page 290 - Ignorant people may object that the upper lakes are fresh, and that cod and whale are salt water fish. But let them know, sir, that cod, like other fish when attacked by their enemies, fly into any water where they can be safest; that whales, when they have a mind to eat cod, pursue them wherever they fly; and that the grand leap of the whale in that chase up the Fall of Niagara is esteemed, by all who have seen it, as one of the finest spectacles in nature.
Page 77 - ... but now-a-days we have scarce a little parson, that does not think it the duty of every man within his reach to sit under his petty ministrations; and that whoever omits them offends God.
Page 93 - In sickness no less than the carefulest nurse, As tender as tender can be. " In peace and good order my household she guides, Right careful to save what I gain ; Yet cheerfully spends, and smiles on the friends I've the pleasure to entertain.
Page 73 - His outward freedom : tyranny must be ; Though to the tyrant thereby no excuse. Yet sometimes nations will decline so low From virtue, which is reason, that no wrong, But justice, and some fatal curse annex'd, Deprives them of their outward liberty ; Their inward lost : witness the irreverent son Of him who built the ark ; who, for the shame Done to his father, heard this heavy curse, Servant of servants, on his vicious race.
Page 36 - I look upon as a great happiness, leisure to read, study, make experiments, and converse at large with such ingenious and worthy men, as are pleased to honor me with their friendship or acquaintance, on such points as may produce something for the common benefit of mankind, uninterrupted by the little cares and fatigues of business.
Page 75 - He that for giving a draught of water to a thirsty person, should expect to be paid with a good plantation, would be modest in. his demands, compared with those who think they deserve heaven for the little good they do on earth.
Page 86 - Persons subject to the hyp complain of the northeast wind, as increasing their malady. But since you promised to send me kisses in that wind, and I find you as good as your word, it is to me the gayest wind that blows, and gives me the best spirits. I write this during a northeast storm of snow, the greatest we have had this winter. Your favours come mixed with the snowy fleeces, which are pure as your virgin innocence, white as your lovely bosom, and as cold.
Page 268 - I have in a private capacity given just cause of offence to any one whatever,) yet they are enemies, and very bitter ones ; and you must expect their enmity will extend in some degree to you, so that your slightest indiscretions will be magnified into crimes, in order the more sensibly to wound and afflict me. It is, therefore, the more necessary for you to be extremely circumspect in all your behaviour, that no advantage may be given to their malevolence.
Page 125 - I have not far to go for an instance ; this very ground that is under me (striking it with his foot) was my land and inheritance and is taken from me by fraud.
Page 113 - We are spirits. That bodies should be lent us, while they can afford us pleasure, assist us in acquiring knowledge, or in doing good to our fellow creatures, is a kind and benevolent act of God. When they become unfit for these purposes, and afford us pain instead of pleasure, instead of an aid become an incumbrance, and answer none of the intentions for which they were given, it is equally kind and benevolent, that a way is provided by which we may get rid of them. Death is that way.

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