Social Justice Feminists in the United States and Germany: A Dialogue in Documents, 1885-1933

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Kathryn Kish Sklar, Anja Schüler, Susan Strasser
Cornell University Press, 1998 - History - 381 pages
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Women reformers in the United States and Germany maintained a brisk dialogue between 1885 and 1933. Drawing on one another's expertise, they sought to alleviate a wide array of social injustices generated by industrial capitalism, such as child labor and the exploitation of women in the workplace. This book presents and interprets documents from that exchange, most previously unknown to historians, which show how these interactions reflected the political cultures of the two nations. On both sides of the Atlantic, women reformers pursued social justice strategies. The documents discussed here reveal the influence of German factory legislation on debates in the United States, point out the differing contexts of the suffrage movement, compare pacifist and antipacifist reactions of women to World War I, and trace shifts in the feminist movements of both countries after the war. Social Justice Feminists in the United States and Germany provides insight into the efforts of American and German women over half a century of profound social change. Through their dialogue, these women explicate their larger political cultures and the place they occupied in them.
  

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Contents

A TRANSATLANTIC DIALOGUE
1
AMERICAN WOMEN
77
Family of Mrs Motto Making Artif1cial Flowers New York City 1911
78
j Kelley Describes the German Workingwomens Movement
85
Kelley Reports on Women Factory Inspectors to a German
95
Kelley Analyzes American Sweatshops for a German Audience
104
Making Party Favors in the Kitchen Berlin 1911
107
Mary Church Terrell Speaks in Berlin
114
Anita Augspurg and Lida Gustava Heymann on the street
237
Florence Kelley Describes the Zurich Congress
239
A Americans Respond to Germanys Need
243
Starving children in Vienna illustration from The Survey
244
Addams and Hamilton Tour a Ravaged Germany
245
A German Nun Writes to Jane Addams
255
A German Activist Appeals to Addams for Help
260
The Weimar President Praises Jane Addams
266

Portrait of Alice Salomon taken for the 19o4 ICW Congress
126
An Early Report on the New York Consumers League
127
Kathe Schirmacher Reports on the International Womens
140
DieFrau Reviews Elizabeth Cady Stan tons Eighty Years and Mare
147
A German Sociologist Describes American Women Factory
155
A German Translation of Twenty Years at Hull House
168
letter from Alice Salomon to Jane Addams
170
A German Activist Responds to Twenty Years
175
Title page of German edition of Twenty Years at Hull House 17677
176
THE DIALOGUE CHANGES DURING WORLD WAR I
181
American delegation to the 1915 Congress at The Hague
182
A Sympathetic Journalist Describes German Womens War Efforts
183
German Radical Women Organize for Peace
189
A Mainstream German Woman Activist Opposes Pacif1sm
196
An American Report on the Hague Congress
202
Resolutions Adopted at the Hague Congress
213
Alice Hamilton and Jane Addams Tour Europe at War
218
German Women Appeal to Jane Addams and Edith Wilson
227
An American Report on the Zurich Congress
229
The Zurich Congress in session 1919
231
Florence Kelley on the 1921 Vienna Congress
267
B Racializing the Dialogue
275
Mary Church Terrell Protests to Jane Addams
279
The WILPF Vienna Congress Resolution on Colonial Troops
282
German Women Return to the Dialogue
287
International group at the 1924 WILPF Congress in Washington D C
291
1o Jane Addams Plans for German Visitors
292
Pages from a Keepsake
294
WILPF booth at Christmas fair in Stuttgart 1931
299
Alice Salomon on the Modern American Woman
300
A Young German Reformer on American Welfare Laws
306
A German Politician Writes for American Reformers
313
Alice Salomon Salutes Jane Addams
316
THE DIALOGUE DESTROYED
319
Social Democratic Party flyer warning women about
320
Glossary of German Organizations
335
Biographical Notes
340
Selected Bibliography
354
Index
369
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Kathryn Kish Sklar, Distinguished Professor of History at the State University of New York, Binghamton, is author of "Florence Kelley and the Nation's Work: The Rise of Women's Political Culture, 1830-1900".

Anja Schuler wurde 1988 in Quedlinburg geborgen. Ihr Studium der Sozialen Arbeit absolvierte sie an Ostfalia Hochschule in Wolfenbuttel. Bereits wahrend des Studiums beschaftigte sie sich mit den Themen Behindertenhilfe und Inklusion. Wahrend des Studiums arbeitet sie bereits in unterschiedlichen Bereichen der Behindertenhilfe. Heute arbeitet sie in der ausserschulischen Bildungsarbeit und einer ihrer Arbeitsschwerpunkte ist Inklusion und Jugendverbandsarbeit.

Susan Strasser is the author of the award winning "Never Done" & "Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass Market." Her articles have appeared in "The New York Times," "The Washington Post," & "The Nation." A professor of history at the University of Delaware, she lives near Washington, D.C.

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