Sense and Sensibility (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cassell, 1908 - 307 pages
100 Reviews
  

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Review: Sense and Sensibility

User Review  - Cathy DuPont - Goodreads

I was willing for want of my daughter, to read Sense and Sensibility. She sagaciously staged and imparted her desire by a shrewd proposal. The holiday was opportune timing with the gaiety of spirits ... Read full review

Review: Sense and Sensibility

User Review  - Gary aka Grasshopper - Goodreads

When I was a kid, growing up on the outskirts of a small city in central NY, I used to gravitate to movies that were set in Gotham. One of my favorites was My Sister Eileen which centers on the ... Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

I
7
II
11
III
16
IV
20
V
25
VI
27
VII
31
VIII
34
XXV
129
XXVI
136
XXVII
142
XXVIII
146
XXIX
155
XXX
163
XXXI
172
XXXII
178

IX
37
X
42
XI
51
XII
55
XIII
61
XIV
65
XV
71
XVI
77
XVII
81
XVIII
85
XIX
92
XX
98
XXI
106
XXII
113
XXIII
119
XXIV
124
XXXIII
186
XXXIV
193
XXXV
199
XXXVI
206
XXXVII
217
XXXVIII
229
XXXIX
236
XL
242
XLI
247
XLII
255
XLIII
269
XLIV
274
XLV
281
XLVI
287
XLVII
291
XLVIII
301

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 45 - Brandon is just the kind of man," said Willoughby one day, when they were talking of him together, "whom everybody speaks well of, and nobody cares about; whom all are delighted to see, and nobody remembers to talk to." "That is exactly what I think of him,
Page 138 - Nay, Elinor, this reproach from you! you who have confidence in no one ! ' 'Me!' returned Elinor, in some confusion; ' indeed, Marianne, I have nothing to tell.' ' Nor I,' answered Marianne with energy ; 'our situations, then, are alike. We have neither of us anything to tell ; you, because you communicate, and I, because I conceal nothing.
Page 143 - ... Mrs. Dashwood, and asked how long they had been in town. Elinor was robbed of all presence of mind by such an address, and was unable to say a word. But the feelings of her sister were instantly expressed. Her face was crimsoned over, and she exclaimed in a voice of the greatest emotion, " Good God I Willoughby, what is the meaning of this ? Have you not received my letters ? Will you not shake hands with me...
Page 28 - On each side of the entrance was a sitting-room, about sixteen feet square ; and beyond them were the offices and the stairs. Four bedrooms and two garrets formed the rest of the house. It had not been built many years, and was in good repair.
Page 43 - Their taste was strikingly alike. The same books, the same passages, were idolised by each ; or if any difference appeared, any objection arose, it lasted no longer than till the force of her arguments and the brightness of her eyes could be displayed.
Page 15 - ... women want for more than that? They will live so cheap! Their housekeeping will be nothing at all. They will have no carriage, no horses, and hardly any servants; they will keep no company, and can have no expenses of any kind ! Only conceive how comfortable they will be! Five hundred a year! I am sure I cannot imagine how they will spend half of it; and as to your giving them more, it is quite absurd to think of it. They will be much more able to give you something.
Page 11 - He did not know what he was talking of, I dare say; ten f<~rone but he was lightheaded at the time. Had he been in his right senses, he could not have thought of such a thing as begging you to give away half your fortune from your own child.
Page 4 - That young lady had a talent for describing the involvements, and feelings, and characters of ordinary life, which is to me the most wonderful I ever met with. The Big Bow-wow strain I can do myself like any now going ; but the exquisite touch, which renders ordinary commonplace things and characters interesting, from the truth of the description and the sentiment, is denied to me.
Page 94 - Elinor was not inclined, after a little observation, to give him credit for being so genuinely and unaffectedly ill-natured or ill-bred as he wished to appear. His temper might perhaps be a little soured by finding, like many others of his sex, that through some unaccountable bias in favour of beauty, he was the husband of a very silly woman, but she knew that this kind of blunder was too common for any sensible man to be lastingly hurt by it.
Page 306 - ... whom, two years before, she had considered too old to be married, and who still sought the constitutional safeguard of a flannel waistcoat.

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