The Institutes; a textbook of the history and system of Roman private law (Google eBook)

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Contents

The Interpretatio
58
The Beginnings of the Jus Gentium
64
Roman Law as the Law of the World The Empire page 14 Jus Civile and Jus Gentium
70
The Praetorian Edict
73
The Dual System of Law
81
The Edictum Hadrianum
86
Roman Jurisprudence
88
The Republican Empire and the Imperial Administration of Justice
104
The Monarchical Empire and the Imperial Legislation
112
Codification
116
The Result
125
CHAPTER III
132
Italy
133
The Glossators
135
The Corpus Juris Canonici
138
The Commentators
140
The Law of the Pandects in Germany
150
THE SYSTEM OF ROMAN PRIVATE LAW 29 The System of Private Law
158
THE LAW OF PERSONS 30 The Conception of a Person and the Kinds thereof
161
CHAPTER I
164
Slavery
165
Note Relationships akin to Slavery
172
Paterfamilias and Filiusfamilias
177
Capitis Deminutio
178
Kxistimationis Minutio
182
Juristic Persons 37 The Nature of a Juristic Person
186
Societies and Foundations
195
THE LAW OF PROPERTY CHAPTER I General Pakt 39 Introduction
204
41 Requisites of a Juristic Act
206
Motive as affecting Juristic Acts
208
The Qualifications of a Juristic Act
213
Capacity of Action
216
Representation
219
Introduction 224
224
Roman Civil Procedure
225
The Legis Actio
229
The Formulary Procedure
240
The Formula
253
Intentio and Actio
257
The System of Actions
263
Condemnatio and Exceptio
266
Actio Perpetua and Actio Temporalis Tempus Utile
282
The Effect of an Action at Law
285
The Procedure Extra Ordinem Interdicta In Integrum Restitutio
289
The Procedure of the Later Empire
296
CHAPTER II
302
59 The Different Kinds of Things 302 60 Real Rights
307
The Conception of Ownership
309
The Acquisition of Ownership A Derivative Acquisition
312
Superficies
350
Pledge
351
The Law of Obligations i the conception and contents of an obligation 73 The Conception of an Obligation Obligatory Right
358
Plurality of Debtors and Creditors
359
The Contents of an Obligation
365
Stricti Juris Negotia and Bonae Fidei Negotia
367
THE MODES IN WHICH OBLIGATIONS ARISE 77 Contracts and Delicts
371
Real Contracts
375
The Verbal Contract
382
The Literal Contract
391
Consensual Contracts
396
Quasi Contracts
408
Pacts
414
IS Delictual Obligations 85 The Private Delicts of Roman Law
417
QuasiDelicts
424
TRANSFER AND EXTINCTION OF OBLIGATIONS 87 Transfer of Obligations
425
Liability for Debts contracted by Another
428
The Extinction of Obligations
433
BOOK III
448
The Family
449
THE LAW OF MARRIAGE 92 Marriage and the Modes of contracting it
452
Marital Power
459
The Proprietary Relations between Husband and Wife
462
95 Dos
465
Donatio propter Nuptias
473
The Termination of Marriage
474
Second Marriages
477
Celibacy and Childlessness
478
The Modes in which Patria Potestas originates
479
The Effect of Patria Potestas
482
The Extinction of Patria Potestas
486
GUARDIANSHIP 103 The Different Kinds of Guardianship
488
The Appointment of Guardians
492
The Effect of the Guardianship
495
106 Termination of Guardianship
499
The Law of Inheritance 108 Hereditary Succession its Foundation and Conception
501
Delatio and Acquisitio of the Hereditas
506
110 Hereditas and Bonorum Posseesio
515
1I1 Intestate Succession
530
Testamentary Succession
540
Succession by Necessity
551
The Effect of the Vesting of an Inheritance
560
Bequests
567
116 Restrictions on Bequests
573
Universal Fideicommissa
574
118 Mortis causa capio
577
Index
579
Cives and Peregrini 173
583

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