Bow and the Lyre: A Platonic Reading of the Odyssey

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Oct 1, 2008 - Literary Criticism - 177 pages
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In this exciting interpretation of the Odyssey, the late renowned scholar Seth Benardete suggests that Homer may have been the first to philosophize in a Platonic sense. He argues that the Odyssey concerns precisely the relation between philosophy and poetry and, more broadly, the rational and the irrational in human beings. In light of this possibility, Bernardete works back and forth from Homer to Plato to examine the relation between wisdom and justice and tries to recover an original understanding of philosophy that Plato, too, recovered by reflecting on the wisdom of the poet. At stake in his argument is no less than the history of philosophy and the ancient understanding of poetry. The Bow and the Lyre is a book that every classicist and historian of philosophy should have.
  

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Contents

1 The Beginnings
1
2 Pattern and Will
17
3 Odysseuss Choice
33
4 Among the Phaeacians
45
5 Odysseuss Own Story
63
6 Odysseuss Lies
103
7 Nonfated Things
117
8 The Suitors and the City
131
9 Recognitions
143
Notes
153
Index
173
About the Author
179
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About the author (2008)

Seth Benardete was professor of classics at New York University. He was the author of The Being of the Beautiful, The Rhetoric of Morality and Philosophy, Socrates' Second Sailing, and The Tragedy and Comedy of Life.

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