Visits and sketches at home and abroad: with tales and miscellanies now first collected, and a new edition of the "Diary of an ennuyee.", Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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Saunders and Otley, 1834 - Art
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Page 259 - Cantemir as well as Rycaut : at that age, he says that he detested all poetry, and adds, " when I was in Turkey, I was oftener tempted to turn mussulman than poet : and have often regretted since that / did not." At page 99, D'Israeli says, " The great poetical genius of our times has openly alienated himself from the land of his brothers," (over the word brothers Lord Byron has written Cains.) " He becomes immortal in the language of a people whom he would contemn, he accepts with ingratitude the...
Page 292 - Angelo, considered a chef d'oauvre, which hangs in the Tribune, to the right of the Venus : now if all the connoisseurs in the world, with Vasari at their head, were to harangue for an hour together on the merits of this picture, I might submit in silence, for I am no connoisseur ; but that it is a disagreeable, a hateful picture, is an opinion which fire could not melt out of me. In spite of Messieurs les Connoisseurs, and Michel Angelo's fame, I would die in it at the stake : for instance, here...
Page 271 - At Covigliajo in the Apennines. O for the pencil of Salvator, or the pen of a Radcliff'e ! But could either, or could both united, give to my mind the scenes of to-day, in all their splendid combinations of beauty and brightness, gloom and grandeur ? A picture may present to the eye a small portion of the boundless whole one aspect of the ever-varying face of nature ; and words, how...
Page 90 - I see !" he exclaimed, snatching the candle from her hand, and throwing the light full on her face. A moment's scrutiny seemed enough, and too much! for giving it back hastily, he supported Cathleen into the kitchen, the old woman leading the way, and placed her on an old settle, the first seat which presented itself. When she was sufficiently recovered to look about her, Cathleen could not help feeling some alarm at finding herself in so gloomy and dreary a place. It had once been a large kitchen,...
Page 101 - The window first suggested itself : the faint moon-light was just struggling through its dirty and cob-webbed panes : it was very small, and Cathleen reflected, that besides the difficulty, and, perhaps impossibility of getting through, it must be some height from the ground: neither could she tell on which side of the house it was situated, nor in what direction to turn, supposing she reached the ground ; and, above all, she was aware that the slightest noise must cause her instant destruction....
Page 131 - She tried to make Guahiba comprehend that in this village she and her children must remain during the rest of their lives, in order that they might go to Heaven after they were dead. Guahiba listened, but understood nothing of what was addressed to her ; nor could she be made to conceive for what purpose she was torn from her husband and her home, nor why she was to dwell for the remainder of her life among a strange people, and against her will. During that night she remained tranquil, watching...
Page 163 - Here's your hat. Now let me see how you can make a bow. (He bows awkwardly.) Hold up your head turn out your toes. That will do capital! (She walks round him with admiration.) How nice you look ! there's ne'er a gentleman of them all can come up to my Dick. Dick (hesitating). But a a Meg, you'll come with me, won't you, and just see me safe in at the door, eh ? Marg.
Page 108 - Another half-mile brought her to the top of a rising ground, within sight of the high-road ; she could ste crowds of people on horseback and on foot, with cars and carriages passing along in one direction ; for it was, though Cathleen did not then know it, the first day of the Cork Assizes. As she gazed, she wished for the wings of a bird that she might in a moment flee over the space which...
Page 293 - Virgin, whose brick-dust colored face, harsh, unfeminine features, and muscular, masculine arms, give me the idea of a washerwoman, (con rispetto parlando !) an infant Saviour with the proportions of a giant : and what shall we say of the nudity of the figures in the background ; profaning the subject and shocking at once good taste and good sense ? A little farther on, the eye rests on the divine Madre di Dio of Correggio : what beauty, what sweetness, what maternal love, and humble adoration are...
Page 150 - Yes ha ! ha ! I could see you thought that good ! and then the dancing ! DICK. Ay, ay ; and there wasn't one amongst them that footed it away like my Margery. And folks says to me, " Pray, who is that pretty modest young woman as hops over the ground as light as a feather ?" says they ; and says I, " Why, that there pretty young woman is my wife, to be sure !

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