The Nautical Magazine: A Journal of Papers on Subjects Connected with Maritime Affairs, Volume 22 (Google eBook)

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Brown, Son and Ferguson, 1853 - Shipping
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Page 592 - SIR, I HAVE the honour to acquaint you, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that...
Page 330 - Her Majesty having taken the said Memorial into consideration was pleased, by and with the advice of Her Privy Council, to approve of what is therein proposed ; and the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty are to give the necessary directions herein accordingly.
Page 654 - ... avoid getting beset, we had nearly to touch the land; indeed, upon several occasions the boats were compelled to be topped up, and poles used to keep the vessel off the grounded ice, which extends all along this coast; nor could we round to, fearful of carrying the jibboom away against the cliffs, which here run nearly east and west.
Page 656 - ... to bear ; a heavy grind which shook every mast, and caused beams and decks to complain as she trembled to the violence of the shock, plainly indicated that the struggle would be but of short duration. At this moment the stream cable was carried away, and several anchors drew. Thinking that we had now sufficiently risked the vessel, orders were given to let go all the warps, and with...
Page 531 - And every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented, gathered themselves unto him; and he became a captain over them: and there were with him about four hundred men.
Page 655 - ... masses, I sent John Kerr (gunner's mate), under very difficult circumstances, to endeavour to reach it and effect its destruction by blasting. He could not, however, find a sufficient space of water to sink the charge, but remarking a large cavity upon the sea face of the floe, he fixed it there, which so far succeeded that it slightly fractured it in three places, which at the moment was scarcely observable from the heavy pressure it was sustaining. By this time the vessel was within a few feet...
Page 666 - Such dainties in such profusion I should imagine never before graced a ship's lower deck ; any stranger to have witnessed this scene could but faintly imagine that he saw a crew which had passed upwards of two years in these dreary regions, and three entirely...
Page 676 - ... about five wersts along the coast. In this bank, •which is exposed to the sea, beams or trunks of trees are found, generally in a horizontal position, but with great irregularity, fifty or more of them together, the largest being about ten inches in diameter. The wood is not very hard, is friable, has a black colour, and a slight gloss. When laid on the fire it does not burn with a flame, but glimmers, and emits a resinous odour.
Page 666 - ... their own resources, enjoying such excellent health — so joyful, so happy : indeed, such a mirthful assemblage, under any circumstances, would be most gratifying to any officer; but, in this lonely situation, I could not but feel deeply impressed, as I contemplated the gay and plenteous sight, with the many and great mercies which a kind and beneficent Providence had extended...
Page 559 - ... in the instructions for filling up the columns, is only such as can be well performed under ordinary circumstances, and it has considered it a minimum, and looks with confidence to occasional enlarged contributions from zealous and intelligent labourers in the great cause of science. " The directions for filling up the columns, and for making certain observations, it will be seen by the minutes, were limited to such only as seemed necessary to the conference to insure uniformity of observation.

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