The Principles of Sanitary Tactics: A Handbook on the Use of Medical Department Detachments and Organizations in Campaign (Google eBook)

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Press of Banta publishing Company, 1911 - Armies - 306 pages
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Page 17 - ... wounded still remain on the battlefield, in consequence of an insufficiency of ambulances and the want of a proper system for regulating their removal in the Army of Virginia. Many have died of starvation ; many more will die in consequence of exhaustion, and all have endured torments which might have been avoided. I ask, sir, that you will give me your aid in this matter ; that you will interpose to prevent a recurrence of such consequences as have followed the recent battle consequences...
Page 30 - The care of the sick and wounded on the march, in camp, on the battlefield, and. after removal therefrom. 4. The methodical disposition of the sick and wounded, so as to insure the retention of those effective, and relieve the fighting force of the non-effective.
Page 30 - The preparation and preservation of individual records of sickness and injury in order that claims may be adjudicated with justice to the government and to the individual.
Page 17 - Medical Department. An ambulance corps should be organized and set in instant operation. I have already laid before you a plan for such an organization, which I think covers the whole ground, but which I am sorry to find does not meet with the approval of the Commander-in-Chief . I am not wedded to it. I only ask that some system may be adopted by which...
Page 17 - Sir : 1 have the honor to ask your attention to the frightful state of disorder existing in the arrangements for removing the wounded from the field of battle, the scarcity of ambulances, the want of organization, the drunkenness and incompetency of the drivers, the total absence of ambulance attendants, are now working their legitimate results results which I feel I have no right to keep from the knowledge of the department. The whole system should be under the charge of the medical department....
Page 17 - I have the honor to ask your attention to the frightful state of disorder existing in the arrangement for removing the wounded from the field of battle. The scarcity of Ambulances, the want of organization, the drunkenness and...
Page 28 - In accordance with section 291, " the senior medical officer of an army or smaller command is charged with the general control of the sanitary troops serving therewith, and commands the independent sanitary units. He may be authorized by the commander to make assignments of the personnel, and in emergencies the entire sanitary service of the command may be placed at his disposition.
Page 17 - Up to this date, six hundred wounded still remain on the battle-field, in consequence of an insufficiency of ambulances, and the want of a proper system for regulating their removal, in the Army of Virginia. Many have died of starvation, many more will die in consequence of exhaustion, and all have endured torments which might have been avoided.
Page 21 - General had not only reduced materially the number of supply wagons for the Medical Department, but the exigencies of the closely contested conflict did not admit of those that were at hand being brought on the field. But the ambulance organization was intact, and such was the perfection of its administration that on the early morning of the 4th of July, the day after the battle ended, not one wounded man of the great number who had fallen (over 14,000) was left on the ground The Inspector General...
Page 48 - The Decision. It is important that you should come to a clear and correct decision that you do so promptly and then execute it vigorously. The new Japanese Field Service Regulations tell us that there are two things above all that should be avoided inaction and hesitation. "To act resolutely even in an erroneous manner is better than to remain inactive and irresolute" that is to say, do something.

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