Waverley novels, Volume 8 (Google eBook)

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Adam & Charles Black, 1886
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Page 328 - There's some say that we wan, Some say that they wan, Some say that nane wan at a', man; But one thing I'm sure, That at Sheriffmuir A battle there was, which I saw, man; And we ran, and they ran, and they ran, and we ran, And we ran and they ran awa', man.
Page 109 - A sail ! a sail ! With throats unslaked, vu h black lips baked, Agape they heard me call : Gramercy ! they for joy did grin, And all at once their breath drew in, As they were drinking all. See! see! (I cried) she tacks no more! Hither to work us weal; Without a breeze, without a tide, She steadies with upright keel!
Page 3 - If a man vow a vow unto the LORD, or swear an oath to bind his soul with a bond; he shall not break his word, he shall do according to all that proceedeth out of his mouth.
Page 105 - Where the hunter of deer and the warrior trode To his hills that encircle the sea.
Page 300 - But if her father disallow her in the day that he heareth; not any of her vows, or of her bonds wherewith she hath bound her soul, shall stand : and the LORD shall forgive her, because her father disallowed her.
Page 300 - ... bond, being in her father's house in her youth ; and her father hear her vow, and her bond wherewith she hath bound her soul, and her father shall hold his peace at her : then all her vows shall stand, and every vow wherewith she hath bound her soul shall stand." " And was it not even so with us V interrupted Ravenswood. " Control thy impatience, young man...
Page 148 - We worldly men, when we see friends and kinsmen Past hope sunk in their fortunes, lend no hand To lift them up, but rather set our feet Upon their heads, to press them to the bottom.
Page 187 - Many such there are, Fair ferns and flowers, and chiefly that tall fern, So stately, of the Queen Osmunda named ; Plant lovelier, in its own retired abode On Grasmere's beach, than Naiad by the side Of Grecian brook, or Lady of the Mere, Sole-sitting by the shores of old romance.
Page 324 - John Ballantyne told me, that after the first day, he always took care to have a dozen of pens made before he seated himself opposite to the sofa on which Scott lay, and that though he often turned himself on his pillow with a groan of torment, he usually continued the sentence in the same breath. But when dialogue of peculiar animation was in progress, spirit seemed to triumph altogether over matter he arose from his couch and walked up and down the room, raising and lowering his voice, and...

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