Lyrics (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Copeland and Day, 1897 - American poetry - 187 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
2
III
3
IV
4
V
5
VI
6
VII
7
VIII
8
XCI
95
XCII
96
XCIII
97
XCIV
98
XCV
99
XCVI
100
XCVII
101
XCVIII
102

IX
9
X
10
XI
11
XII
12
XIII
14
XIV
15
XV
16
XVI
17
XVII
18
XVIII
19
XIX
20
XX
21
XXI
22
XXII
23
XXIII
24
XXIV
25
XXV
26
XXVI
27
XXVII
28
XXVIII
29
XXIX
30
XXX
31
XXXI
32
XXXII
33
XXXIII
34
XXXIV
35
XXXV
36
XXXVI
37
XXXVII
38
XXXVIII
39
XXXIX
40
XL
42
XLI
43
XLII
44
XLIII
45
XLIV
46
XLV
47
XLVI
48
XLVII
49
XLVIII
50
XLIX
51
L
52
LI
53
LII
54
LIII
55
LIV
56
LV
57
LVI
58
LVII
59
LVIII
60
LIX
61
LX
62
LXI
63
LXII
64
LXIII
65
LXIV
66
LXV
67
LXVI
68
LXVII
69
LXVIII
70
LXIX
71
LXX
72
LXXI
73
LXXII
74
LXXIII
75
LXXIV
76
LXXV
77
LXXVI
78
LXXVII
79
LXXVIII
80
LXXIX
81
LXXX
82
LXXXI
83
LXXXII
84
LXXXIII
86
LXXXIV
88
LXXXV
89
LXXXVI
90
LXXXVII
91
LXXXVIII
92
LXXXIX
93
XC
94
XCIX
103
C
104
CI
105
CII
106
CIII
107
CIV
108
CV
109
CVI
110
CVII
111
CVIII
112
CIX
113
CX
115
CXI
116
CXII
117
CXIII
118
CXIV
119
CXV
120
CXVI
121
CXVII
122
CXVIII
123
CXIX
124
CXX
125
CXXI
126
CXXII
127
CXXIII
128
CXXIV
129
CXXV
130
CXXVI
131
CXXVII
132
CXXVIII
133
CXXIX
134
CXXX
135
CXXXI
136
CXXXII
137
CXXXIII
138
CXXXIV
139
CXXXV
140
CXXXVI
141
CXXXVII
143
CXXXVIII
144
CXXXIX
145
CXL
146
CXLI
147
CXLII
148
CXLIII
149
CXLIV
150
CXLV
151
CXLVI
152
CXLVII
153
CXLVIII
154
CXLIX
155
CL
156
CLI
157
CLII
158
CLIII
159
CLIV
160
CLV
161
CLVI
162
CLVII
163
CLVIII
164
CLIX
165
CLX
166
CLXI
167
CLXII
168
CLXIII
169
CLXIV
170
CLXV
171
CLXVI
172
CLXVII
173
CLXVIII
174
CLXIX
175
CLXX
177
CLXXI
179
CLXXII
180
CLXXIII
181
CLXXIV
182
CLXXV
183
CLXXVI
184
CLXXVII
185
CLXXVIII
186
CLXXIX
187

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Popular passages

Page 111 - THE aster puts its purple on When flowers begin to fall, To suit the solemn antiphon Of Autumn's ritual ; And deigns, unwearied, to stand In robes pontifical, Till Indian Summer leaves the land, And Winter spreads the pall.
Page 105 - LITTLE masters, hat in hand Let me in your presence stand, Till your silence solve for me This your threefold mystery. Tell me for I long to know How, in darkness there below, Was your fairy fabric spun, Spread and fashioned, three in one Did your gossips gold and blue, Sky and Sunshine, choose for you, Ere your triple forms were seen, Suited liveries of green ? Can ye, if ye dwelt indeed Captives of a prison seed, Like the Genie, once again Get you back into the grain ? Little masters,...
Page 129 - MY God has hid Himself from me Behind whatever else I see; Myself the nearest mystery As far beyond my grasp as He. And yet, in darkest night, I know, While lives a doubt-discerning glow, That larger lights above it throw These shadows in the vale below.
Page 166 - O'ER each the soul of Beauty flung A shadow mingled with the breath Of music that the Sirens sung, Whose utterance is death.
Page 24 - E'en this, Lord, didst Thou bless This pain of sleeplessness The livelong night, Urging God's gentlest angel from Thy side, That anguish only might with Thee abide Until the light. Yea, e'en the last and best. Thy victory and rest, Came thus to Thee ; For 'twas while others calmly slept around That Thou alone in sleeplessness wast found, To comfort me.
Page 113 - Ah, whence, in sylvan solitudes remote. Hast learned the lore That breeds delight in every echoing note The woodlands o'er; As when, through slanting sun, descends the quickening shower ? Thy hermitage is peopled with the dreams That gladden sleep; Here Fancy dallies with delirious themes Mid shadows deep, Till eyes unused to tears, with wild emotions weep. We rise, alas, to find our visions fled! But thine remain. Night weaves of golden harmonies the thread. And fills thy brain With joys that overflow...
Page 22 - THE SISTERS THE waves forever move; The hills forever rest: Yet each the heavens approve, And Love alike hath blessed A Martha's household care, A Mary's cloistered prayer. ANONYMOUS ANONYMOUS nor needs a name To tell the secret whence the flame, With light, and warmth, and incense, came A new creation to proclaim. So was it when, His labor done, God saw His work, and smiled thereon: His glory in the picture shone, But name upon the canvas, none.
Page 114 - Yet thou, from mortal influence apart, Seek'st naught of praise; The empty plaudits of the emptier heart Taint not thy lays: Thy Maker's smile alone thy tuneful bosom sways. Teach me, thou warbling eremite, to sing Thy rhapsody; Nor borne on vain ambition's vaunting wing, But led of thee, To rise from earthly dreams to hymn Eternity.
Page 54 - With thy sharp teeth this knot intrinsicate Of life at once untie; poor venomous fool, Be angry, and dispatch.
Page 53 - THE sculptor in the marble found Her hidden from the world around, As in a donjon keep : With gentle hand he took away The coverlet that o'er her lay, But left her fast asleep. And still she slumbers ; e'en as he Who saw in far futurity What now before us lies, The fairest vision that the stream Of night, subsiding, leaves agleam Beneath the noonday skies. INTERVIEW. I SAT with chill December Beside the evening fire.

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