For the President's Eyes Only: Secret Intelligence and the American Presidency from Washington to Bush

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Harper Collins, Mar 1, 1996 - History - 688 pages
13 Reviews
From the co-author of KGB: The Inside Story and an acknowledged authority on the subject comes "the most important book ever written about American intelligence."--David Kahn, author of The Codebreakers and Hitler's Spies
  

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Review: For the President's Eyes Only: Secret Intelligence & the American Presidency from Washington to Bush

User Review  - Andy - Goodreads

It's a comprehensive look at the subject matter, but unfortunately the writing is extremely dry. The books could use an updated edition, too, as its coverage ends during the first Bush administration. Read full review

Review: For the President's Eyes Only: Secret Intelligence & the American Presidency from Washington to Bush

User Review  - Greg Fanoe - Goodreads

I admit, it was a bit tough to get through this, but it had a lot of great information and made every president from Truman on through George HW Bush look pretty bad! Good work. Read full review

Contents

The President and Intelligence
1
From George Washington to the Twentieth Century
6
From Woodrow Wilson to Herbert Hoover
30
The Path to Pearl Harbor
75
Roosevelt at War 19411945
123
HarryS Truman 19451953
149
Dwight D Eisenhower 19531961
199
John F Kennedy 19611963
257
Gerald R Ford 19741977
397
Jimmy Carter 19771981
425
Ronald Reagan 19811989
457
George Bush 19891993
503
Intelligence After the Cold War
537
Acknowledgments
543
Notes
545
Bibliography
627

Lyndon B Johnson 19631969
307
Richard M Nixon 19691974
350

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Page 154 - From the moment of surrender the authority of the Emperor and the Japanese Government to rule the State shall be subject to the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers, who will take such steps as he deems proper to effectuate the surrender terms.
Page 211 - It is now clear that we are facing an implacable enemy whose avowed objective is world domination by whatever means and at whatever cost. There are no rules in such a game. Hitherto acceptable norms of human conduct do not apply.
Page 294 - Within the past week unmistakable evidence has established the fact that a series of offensive missile sites is now in preparation on that imprisoned island. The purposes of these bases can be none other than to provide a nuclear strike capability against the Western Hemisphere.
Page 16 - From this material, under cover of " liberty of speech," " liberty of the press," and " habeas corpus," they hoped to keep on foot amongst us a most efficient corps of spies, informers, suppliers, and aiders and abettors of their cause in a thousand ways. They knew that in times such as they were inaugurating, by the Constitution itself, the
Page 12 - Circumstances of political importance which involve the lives and fortunes of many have hitherto kept secret what this paper now reveals. Harvey Birch has for years been a faithful and unrequited servant of his country. Though man does not, may God reward him for his conduct!
Page 299 - Let us therefore show statesmanlike wisdom. I propose: We, for our part, will declare that our ships, bound for Cuba, will not carry any kind of armaments. You would declare that the United States will not invade Cuba with its forces and will not support any sort of forces which might intend to carry out an invasion of Cuba.
Page 114 - Say very secretly to them that there is extreme danger that war may suddenly break out between the Anglo-Saxon nations and Japan through some clash of arms and add that the time of the breaking out of this war may come quicker than anyone dreams.
Page 171 - ... (4) to perform, for the benefit of the existing intelligence agencies, such additional services of common concern as the National Security Council determines can be more efficiently accomplished centrally; (5) to perform such other functions and duties related to intelligence affecting the national security as the National Security Council may from time to time direct.

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About the author (1996)

Christopher Andrew is Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Cambridge University, a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, former Visiting Professor of National Security at Harvard University, and guest lecturer at numerous American universities and the CIA. His writings, translated into many languages, have established him as one of the world's leading authorities in intelligence history. Professor Andrew is also a frequent host of BBC TV and radio programs on history and world affairs.

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