Driving Forces in Physical, Biological and Socio-economic Phenomena: A Network Science Investigation of Social Bonds and Interactions (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, May 31, 2007 - Science
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This book was first published in 2007. In recent years network science has become a dynamic and promising discipline; here it is extended to explore social and historical phenomena. While we experience social interactions every day, there is little quantitative knowledge on them. Instead we are often tempted to resort to fanciful explanations to explain social trends. Exogenous and endogenous interactions are often the key to understanding social phenomena and unravelling historical mysteries. This book begins by explaining how it is possible to bridge the gap between physics and sociology by exploring how network theory can apply to both. It then examines the macro- and micro-interactions in societies. The chapters are largely self-contained, allowing readers easily to access and understand the sections of most interest. This multi-disciplinary book will be fascinating to all physicists who have an interest in the human sciences and it will provide an alternative perspective to graduate students and researchers in sociology and econophysics.
  

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
26
Section 3
35
Section 4
62
Section 5
80
Section 6
105
Section 7
135
Section 8
150
Section 9
167
Section 10
173
Section 11
192
Section 12
205

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Page 7 - ... fall. This radiation is regarded by many observers as a secondary radiation, but more recent experiments seem to show that it consists mainly of primary ^-particles, which have been scattered inside the material to such an extent that they emerge again at the same side of the plate.* For a-particles a similar effect has not previously been observed...
Page 7 - X = h/mv for the wave length of a matter wave, where h is Planck's constant, m the mass of the particle, and v its velocity.

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