Cabinet portrait gallery of British worthies, Volumes 1-3 (Google eBook)

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1845 - History
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Page 151 - Be of good comfort, master Ridley, and play the man. We shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
Page 60 - Give ample room and verge enough The characters of hell to trace. Mark the year and mark the night When Severn shall re-echo with affright The shrieks of death through Berkeley's roof that ring, Shrieks of an agonizing king...
Page 33 - With silver drops the meads yet spread for ruth ; In active games of nimbleness and strength, Where we did strain, trained with swarms of youth, Our tender limbs that yet shot up in length. The secret groves, which oft we made resound Of pleasant plaint, and of our ladies praise ; Recording soft what grace each one had found, What hope of speed, what dread of long delays.
Page 129 - My father was a yeoman and had no lands of his own ; only he had a farm of three or four pounds by the year at the uttermost, and hereupon he tilled so much as kept half a dozen men. He had walk for a hundred sheep and my mother milked thirty kine...
Page 29 - So thick the boughis and the leavis green Beshaded all the alleys that there were, And mids of every arbour might be seen The sharpe greene sweete juniper, Growing so fair with branches here and there, That as it seemed to a lyf without, The boughis spread the arbour all about.
Page 52 - For we can give such figures to transparent bodies, and dispose them in such order with respect to the eye and the objects, that the rays shall be refracted and bent towards any place we please ; so that we shall see the object near at hand, or at a distance under any angle we please. And thus from an incredible distance we may read the smallest letters, and may number the smallest particles of dust and sand...
Page 129 - Had I but served God as diligently as I have served the King, He would not have given me over, in my grey hairs. Howbeit, this is my just reward for my pains and diligence, not regarding my service to God, but only my duty to my prince.
Page 70 - ... to be godfather to his child, and named him Peter. But afterwards, proving a dainty and effeminate youth, he was commonly called by the diminutive of his name, Peterkin, or Perkin. For as for the name of Warbeck, it was given him when they did but guess at it, before examinations had been taken. But yet he had been so much talked on by that name, as it stuck by him after his true name of Osbeck was known.
Page 154 - I have been brought up," quoth he, "at Oxford, at an Inn of Chancery, at Lincoln's Inn, and also in the King's Court, and so forth from the lowest degree to the highest; and yet have I in yearly revenues at this present left me little above an hundred pounds by the year.
Page 133 - At length his sovereign frowns the train of state Mark the keen glance, and watch the sign to hate. Where'er he turns, he meets a stranger's eye, His suppliants scorn him, and his followers fly; Now drops at once the pride of awful state, The golden canopy, the glittering plate, The regal palace, the luxurious board, The liveried army, and the menial lord; With age, with cares, with maladies oppress'd, He seeks the refuge of monastic rest.

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