Farmer George, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Sir I. Pitman and sons, Limited, 1907 - Great Britain
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Page 292 - Kent. Vex not his ghost. O, let him pass! He hates him That would upon the rack of this tough world Stretch him out longer.
Page 276 - The sun to me is dark And silent as the moon, When she deserts the night, Hid in her vacant interlunar cave.
Page 49 - He made an administration so checkered and speckled ; he put together a piece of joinery so crossly indented and whimsically dovetailed, a cabinet so variously inlaid, such a piece of diversified mosaic, such a tesselated pavement without cement, here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white, patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans, whigs and tories, treacherous friends and open enemies, that it was indeed a very curious show, but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to...
Page 171 - Sir, The circumstances of this audience are so extraordinary, the language you have now held is so extremely proper, and the feelings you have discovered so justly adapted to the occasion, that I must say that I not only receive with pleasure the assurance of the friendly dispositions of the United States, but that I am very glad the choice has fallen upon you to be their minister.
Page 291 - I said to those who heard me first in America ' O brothers, speaking the same dear mother tongue O comrades, enemies no more, let us take a mournful hand together as we stand by this royal corpse, and call a truce to battle ! Low he lies to whom the proudest used to kneel once, and who was cast lower than the poorest: dead, whom millions prayed for in vain. Driven off his throne ; buffeted by rude hands ; with his children in revolt ; the darling of his old age killed before him untimely,...
Page 171 - I shall esteem myself the happiest of men, if I can be instrumental in recommending my country more and more to your Majesty's royal benevolence...
Page 144 - I trust it is obvious to your lordships that all attempts to impose servitude upon such men, to establish despotism over such a mighty continental nation must be vain, must be fatal. We shall be forced ultimately to retract; let us retract while we can, not when we must.
Page 170 - I have the honor to assure your Majesty of their unanimous disposition and 'desire to cultivate the most friendly and liberal intercourse between your Majesty's subjects and their citizens, and of their best wishes for your Majesty's health and happiness, and for that of your royal family. The appointment of a Minister from the United States to your Majesty's court will form an epoch in the history of England and of America.
Page 20 - Taxation is no part of the governing or legislative power. The taxes are a voluntary gift and grant of the Commons alone. In legislation, the three estates of the realm are alike concerned ; but the concurrence of the Peers and the Crown to a tax, is only necessary to close with the form of a law. The gift and grant is of the Commons alone.
Page 93 - He ever warr'd with freedom and the free : Nations as men, home subjects, foreign foes, So that they utter'd the word 'Liberty !' Found George the Third their first opponent. Whose History was ever stain'd as his will be With national and individual woes ? I grant his household abstinence ; I grant His neutral virtues, which most monarchs want...

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